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I have spent some time looking for answers but didn't find anything that was satisfactory.

Just interested in how some more seasoned C++ people solve this kind of problem as now I am doing a little more production related coding than prototyping.

Let say you have a class that has say a unordered_map (hashmap) that holds a lot of data, say 500Mb. You want to write an accessor that returns some subset of that data in an efficient manner.

Take the following, where BigData is some class that stores a moderate amount of data.

Class A
{
   private:
      unordered_map<string, BigData> m_map;   // lots of data

   public:

    vector<BigData>   get10BestItems()
    {
        vector<BigData>  results;
        for ( ........  // iterate over m_map and add 10 best items to results
        // ... 
       return results;
    }

};

The accessor get10BestItems is not very efficient in this code because it first copies the items to the results vector, then the results vector is copied when the function is returned (copying from the function stack).

You can't have a vector of references in c__ for various reasons, which would be the obvious answer:

vector<BigData&> results;     // vector can't contain references.

You could create the results vector on the heap and pass a reference to that:

vector<BigData>&   get10BestItems()    // returns a reference to the vector
    {
        vector<BigData>  results = new vector<BigData>;   // generate on heap
        for ( ........  // iterate over m_map and add 10 best items to results
            // ... 
       return results;   // can return the reference 
    } 

But then you are going to run into memory leak issues if you are not careful. It is also slow (heap memory) and still copies data from the map to the vector.

So we can look back at c-style coding and just use pointers:

vector<BigData*>   get10BestItems()    // returns a vector of pointers
    {
        vector<BigData*>  results ; // vectors of pointers
        for ( ........  // iterate over m_map and add 10 best items to results
        // ... 
       return results;  
    } 

But most sources say to not use pointers unless absolutely necessary. There are options to use smart_pointers and the boost ptr_vector but I rather try to avoid these if possible.

I do no that the map is going to be static so I am not too worried about bad pointers. Just one issue if the code will have to be difference to handle pointers. Stylistically this is not pleasant:

const BigData&   getTheBestItem()    // returns a const reference
{
       string bestID;
       for ( ........  // iterate over m_map, find bestID
       // ... 
       return m_map[bestID] ; // return a referencr to the best item
}


vector<BigData*>   get10BestItems()    // returns a vector of pointers
{    
        vector<BigData*>  results ; // vectors of pointers
        for_each ........  // iterate over m_map and add 10 best items to results
        // ... 
       return results;  
 };

E.g., if you want a single item then it is easy to return a reference.

Finally option is to simply make the Hash-map public and return a vector of keys (in this case strings):

Class A
{
      public:

         unordered_map<string, BigData> m_map;   // lots of data



    vector<string>   get10BestItemKeys()
    {
        vector<string>  results;
        for (........  // iterate over m_map and add 10 best KEYS to results
        // ... 
       return results;
    }

};



A aTest;
... // load data to map

vector <string> best10 =  aTest.get10BestItemKeys();
for ( .... // iterate over all KEYs in best10
{
    aTest.m_map.find(KEY);  // do something with item.
    // ...
} 

What is the best solution? Speed is important but I want ease of development and safe programming practices.

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1  
"to avoid copying large data" - then perhaps a reference to a vector of references? –  user529758 Feb 8 '13 at 17:46

4 Answers 4

I would just go with a vector of pointers if the map is constant. You can always return const pointers if you want to avoid the data being changed.

References are great for when they work but there's a reason we still have pointers (for me this would fall under the category of being 'necessary').

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I would do something similar to the following:

Class A
{
private:
    unordered_map<string, BigData> m_map;   // lots of data
    vector<BigData*> best10;

public:
    A()
        : best10(10)
    {
        // Other constructor stuff
    }

    const vector<BigData*>&   get10BestItems()
    {
       // Set best10[0] through best10[9] with the pointers to the best 10
       return best10;
    }

};

Note a few things:

  • The vector isn't being reallocated each time and is being returned as a constant reference, so nothing is allocated or copied when you call get10BestItems.

  • Pointers are just fine in this situation. The things you read about avoiding pointers were probably in relation to heap allocations, in which case std::unique_ptr or std::shared_ptr are now preferred.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the very quick reply. Seems to be a consensus that pointers are not too evil in this situation. –  user1978816 Feb 8 '13 at 18:03

This sounds like a job for boost::ref to me. Just change your original code slightly:

typedef std::vector<boost::ref<BigData> > BestItems;

BestItems  get10BestItems()
    {
        BestItems  results;
        for ( ........  // iterate over m_map and add 10 best items to results
        // ... 
       return results;
    }

Now you're notionally only returning a reference to each item within your return vector making it small and cheap to copy (if the compiler isn't able to optimize away the return copy completely).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank yo for the quick reply. i will look into boost:ref, is it part of c++11? –  user1978816 Feb 8 '13 at 18:06

I usually use boost::range and I found it is invaluable in so many situations, especially the one you describe.

You can keep the range object and iterate over it, etc.

But I should mention I don't know what happens if you add/remove on object between when you get the range and when you use it, so you may want to check that out before using it.

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