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Say I have a class:

public class MyTask implements Runnable {
    @Inject
    private Fizz fizz;

    // Getters and setters for 'fizz'.

    @Override
    public void run() {
        if(fizz.alleviatesBuzz())
            doA();
        else
            doB();
    }

    private void doA() { ... }

    private void doB() { ... }
}

And then I have another class:

public class MyTaskDispatcher {
    @Inject
    private ThreadFactory threadFactory;

    private Executor executor;

    // Getter and setter for 'threadFactory'.

    public void dispatch(MyTask task) {
        if(executor == null)
            executor = Executors.newCachedThreadPool(threadFactory);

        executor.submit(task);
    }
}

So Guice injects MyTask with a Fizz, and also injects MyTaskDispatcher with a ThreadFactory that is then used for creating and executing MyTask instances that it is passed. And, since its a cached pool, it only creates a new thread when one is needed but is not available.

I'm wondering how Guice "behaves" in a multi-threaded environment when we inject Fizz as a singleton or a non-singleton.

Let's start with the non-singleton for-instance:

public class MyAppModule extends AbstractModule {
    @Override
    public void configure() {
        bind(Fizz.class).to(FizzImpl.class);

        // I don't think the functionality of MyThreadFactory
        // really matters for the sake of this question.
        bind(ThreadFactory.class).to(MyThreadFactory.class);
    }

    @Provides
    FizzImpl providesFizz() {
        return new FizzImpl(true, Buzz.ALWAYS, 35);
    }

    // I *believe* we always want the ThreadFactory to be singleton,
    // because all of the threads spawn from it and its executor.
    @Provides @Singleton
    ThreadFactory providesThreadFactory() {
        return new MyThreadFactory(12);
    }
}

Now let's say the app has been running for a while, and 3 separate MyTasks have been submitted, and thus 3 running threads exist. Since we did not ask Guice to inject the Fizzes as singleton, I assume that each thread has its own copy of the injected FizzImpl, and we don't have to add any synchronize-type code to prevent the 3 FizzImpls from colliding and causing thread issues.

But what happens when we make Guice inject FizzImpl as a singleton?!? Now, in MyAppModule:

    @Provides @Singleton
    FizzImpl providesFizz() {
        return new FizzImpl(true, Buzz.ALWAYS, 35);
    }

If Guice only provides 1 global, singleton instance of FizzImpl, what are the downstream ramifications of that FizzImpl "copy" (if that's the right word for it) inside each of the 3 spawned threads? What are the pitfalls to watch out for? What are ways of combating these pitfalls? Thanks in advance.

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4  
If you're injecting a @Singleton, then you'll have three references to the same object. I'm not sure what about this is surprising or different than what would happen if you didn't use DI. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 8 '13 at 18:02
    
Thanks @Louis Wasserman (+1) - so in this case, I would have to make sure that the singleton FizzImpl was thread-safe, yes? –  IAmYourFaja Feb 8 '13 at 18:21
1  
Absolutely. That's true of any object referenced by multiple threads. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 8 '13 at 19:04
    
Hmmm. very interdasting. –  IAmYourFaja Feb 8 '13 at 19:07

1 Answer 1

Nope, Fizz will be created with MyTask instance and it will persist druing multiple thread calls. If you want to have a Fizz copy for each thread you have to do it in lazy way.

public class MyTask implements Runnable {
    @Inject
    private Provider<Fizz> fizzProvider;

    // Getters and setters for 'fizz'.

    @Override
    public void run() {
        Fizz fizz = fizzProvider.get();
        if(fizz.alleviatesBuzz())
            doA();
        else
            doB();
    }

    private void doA() { ... }

    private void doB() { ... }
}

How ever if you put a Singleton flag to Fizz binding, the provider will return same instance when you call fizzProvider.get(), so all threads will have the same instance. You have to keep it non-singleton.

Also your module is wrong, you should use method or implicit binding, not both. Also you can't provide instance and inject it's interface.

public class MyAppModule extends AbstractModule {
    @Override
    public void configure() {
        bind(Fizz.class).to(FizzImpl.class);
        //or bind(Fizz.class).toInstance(new FizzImpl(true, Buzz.ALWAYS, 35)); //Singleton!!
        //or bind(Fizz.class).toProvider(new Provider<Fizz>() {
        //      @Override
        //      public Subject get() {
        //        return new FizzImpl(true, Buzz.ALWAYS, 35);
        //      }
        //    });

        // I don't think the functionality of MyThreadFactory
        // really matters for the sake of this question.
        bind(ThreadFactory.class).to(MyThreadFactory.class);
    }
}

or

public class MyAppModule extends AbstractModule {
    @Override
    public void configure() {
    }

    @Provides
    Fizz providesFizz() {
        return new FizzImpl(true, Buzz.ALWAYS, 35);
    }

    // I *believe* we always want the ThreadFactory to be singleton,
    // because all of the threads spawn from it and its executor.
    @Provides @Singleton
    ThreadFactory providesThreadFactory() {
        return new MyThreadFactory(12);
    }
}

Hope it will help!

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