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I am implementing an Expression solver, but I am having some problems with pattern matching. I have the following code

data Expression a where
                Const   ∷  Int → Expression Int
                Add ∷  Expression Int → Expression Int → Expression Int
                Sub ∷  Expression Int → Expression Int → Expression Int


eval ∷  Expression a → a
eval (Const a) = a

eval (Add exp1 exp2) = (val1 + val2)
  where
    val1 = eval exp1
    val2 = eval exp2


eval (Sub exp1 exp2) = (val1 - val2)
  where
    val1 = eval exp1
    val2 = eval exp2

But since eval Add and eval Sub are very similar and I could want another operations I though of doing a more generic implementation, but I am having some problems. I though of doing like

data Op = Add | Sub

data Expression a where
                Const   ∷  Int → Expression Int
                Op ∷  Expression Int → Expression Int → Expression Int

eval (Op exp1 exp2) = case Op of
                           Add → (val1 + val2)
                           Sub → (val1 - val2)
                      where
                        val1 = eval exp1
                        val2 = eval exp2 

But it doesn't work. Is it possible to do something like this? Thanks in advance

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I take it you're planning to do more than just Expression Int, otherwise the GADT is overkill and you could use a standard ADT. –  AndrewC Feb 8 '13 at 20:40
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This does not work because you are defining Op as both a data constructor and a type. The type Op has two constructors Add and Sub, but the Expression type has an Op constructor. This code is confusing the two.

The case statement of your eval function attempts to match of the value Op, but Op is a constructor that takes two arguments in this context, so you can't pattern match on it. I suspect you are going for something like this

data Op = Add | Sub

data Expression a where
                Const ::  Int -> Expression Int
                Op ::  Op -> Expression Int -> Expression Int -> Expression Int

eval (Const c)         = c
eval (Op op exp1 exp2) = case op of
                           Add -> (val1 + val2)
                           Sub -> (val1 - val2)
                      where
                        val1 = eval exp1
                        val2 = eval exp2

You will have to include a field in the Op constructor that denotes what operation is to be performed. Since you have to match on the that operation anyway, it would probably be nicer to stick with the original definition of Expression.

Another possibility that is simpler and easier to extend might be something like the following

data Expression a where
    Const ::  Int -> Expression Int
    Op    ::  (a -> b -> c) -> Expression a -> Expression b -> Expression c

eval :: Expression a -> a
eval (Const c)        = c
eval (Op f exp1 exp2) = f (eval exp1) (eval exp2)

where an Op wraps the actual function up with it. You would not be able to do nice things like print out the expression and know what function it corresponds to though.

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2  
Another thing you can do: data Op a where Add :: Op Int, interpret :: Op a -> a -> a -> a ; interpret Add = (+), and eval Op op exp1 exp2 = interpret op (eval exp1) (eval exp2). Not that this is necessarily any better or worse, mind you. –  Antal S-Z Feb 8 '13 at 19:47
1  
@AntalS-Z I like how that separates off the Op related dispatching from evaluation. That way you can add more Ops without needing to change the eval logic. –  sabauma Feb 8 '13 at 19:53
    
Despite having to use eval(Op Add...) I liked your suggestion. Isn't there a way to not having to include the Op in the function call? –  J0rge Feb 8 '13 at 22:35
    
@J0rge Do you mean not having the Op field in the Op constructor? This is where having multiple things called 'Op' gets confusing. –  sabauma Feb 8 '13 at 22:43
    
@J0rge I don't think you can get around the need to include something like Op that encodes the actual operation to perform; that might be as an extra field in the constructor or adding more constructors to the Expression type. See my edit for a slightly different way to go about it. You can store the actual function you want to use in the Op constructor, rather than something that you use to lookup said function. –  sabauma Feb 8 '13 at 22:53
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Riffing on the comments:

data Op a b c where
    Add :: Op Int Int Int
    Sub :: Op Int Int Int
    Less :: Op Int Int Bool

interpretOp :: Op a b c -> a -> b -> c
interpretOp Add = (+)
interpretOp Sub = (-)
interpretOp Less = (<)

data Expression a where
    Const :: Int -> Expression Int
    Op :: Op a b c -> Expression a -> Expression b -> Expression c

eval :: Expression a -> a
eval (Const x) = x
eval (Op op a b) = interpretOp op (eval a) (eval b)
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Riffing on luqui's answer:

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies, MultiParamTypeClasses, GADTs #-}
class OpLike op a b where
    type Result op a b
    interpret :: op -> a -> b -> Result op a b

data Expression a where
    Const :: a -> Expression a
    Op :: OpLike op a b => op -> Expression a -> Expression b -> Expression (Result op a b)

eval :: Expression a -> a
eval (Const x) = x
eval (Op op a b) = interpret op (eval a) (eval b)

Now you can add operators at any point in your program, without having to alter something like luqui's Op datatype. Here's a very contrived example:

data Add = Add
add x y = Op Add x y

instance OpLike Add Int Int where
    type Result Add Int Int = Int
    interpret Add x y = x + y

instance OpLike Add Int Bool where
    type Result Add Int Bool = String
    interpret Add x y = if y then reverse (show x) else show x    

example = (Const (3::Int) `add` Const (10::Int)) `add` (Const True)

example has type Expression String and evaluates to "31" :-)

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