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I did something like:

Grid(int row, int col):num_of_row_(row), num_of_col_(col) {
     grid_ = new vector<vector<bool> > (row, col);  
}

which dynamically allocates nested vector. Is this correct? I mean using this syntax:

new vector<vector<type> > (outersize, innersize)

where ** outersize, innersize are both "int" variables.**

update: I actually used this code, and it works. I just want to find out why.

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Beware vector<bool> may not be what you think it is on some implementations. And I don't think this is correct, but I haven't done it in a while so I'll let others more knowledgable in this than I answer definitively... –  Michael Dorgan Feb 8 '13 at 18:54
    
Did you try compiling it? –  aschepler Feb 8 '13 at 18:55
    
vector is a dynamic container. That means, it will resize itself according to what you're feeding it. A 'new' is unnecessary in this context. Are you actually looking for new bool[outer][inner];? –  Refugnic Eternium Feb 8 '13 at 18:55
1  
@RefugnicEternium: Not true. std::vector<int> v; v[1] = 2; is Undefined Behavior, not an automatic resize. –  aschepler Feb 8 '13 at 19:00
2  
The question is, why "new" at all? Do you really need it on the heap? –  Frank Osterfeld Feb 8 '13 at 19:04
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The second parameter passed to the constructor is the element of the vector to be repeated outersize times. You should use this syntax:

new vector<vector<type> > (outersize, vector<type>(innersize, elementValue));

For example, to make a 50x25 grid of bool initially set to true, use:

vector<vector<bool> > *grid = new vector<vector<bool> >(50, vector<bool>(25, true));
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Hi, I tried this. But in this case, I need innersize, outersize both be variables. –  JASON Feb 8 '13 at 19:04
    
@AlanShore That's perfectly fine, they do not need to be constants. Arguably, that's the biggest advantage of vectors over built-in arrays. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 8 '13 at 19:08
    
Thanks but I tried variables. And it gives me the this error: ‘row’ cannot appear in a constant-expression –  JASON Feb 8 '13 at 19:10
    
@AlanShore I don't think it should: here is a demo on ideone when I use variables. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 8 '13 at 19:20
    
Thanks! It works now. : ) –  JASON Feb 8 '13 at 19:22
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