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I have a rails project that I'm using wicked_pdf to generate PDFs from generated html and I'm appending a slick footer to each page of that pdf. A lot of these pages to pdfs are actually coming from parsed word .doc or .txt files and then I convert them to PDF with this footer upon download.

But... PDFs are also being uploaded to the system and although not parsed and displayed in the application I need them upon download to have the footer as the other files above. Is there anyway to do this?

I don't need to edit anything in the PDF, just need to add this footer.

Thanks a bunch!

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If it is already a PDF, then wicked_pdf won't help you here, but you might be able to use Prawn or PDFtk.

You can layer some content on top of the bottom area of each page of an existing pdf with the following:

require 'prawn'
require 'pdf-reader'

respond_to do |format|
  format.pdf {
    input_filename = Rails.root.join('input.pdf')

    page_count = PDF::Reader.new(input_filename).page_count

    file = Prawn::Document.new(:skip_page_creation => true) do |pdf|

      page_count.times do |num|
        pdf.start_new_page(:template => input_filename, :template_page => num+1)
        pdf.move_down(700)
        pdf.text('FOOTER TEXT')
      end

    end
    send_data file.render
  }
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply. So to output for download would I need to do file = Prawn::Document.generate() do |pdf| and so on? Then send_file file? – Sparkmasterflex Feb 11 '13 at 19:13
    
@Sparkmasterflex I would suggest you have this as part of the upload process, so the conversion only happens once and is stored on disk, instead of on every download. Perhaps in an observer; then use send_file on the output_filename, but I've updated the answer to generate it on the fly, provided you know where input_filename comes from. – Unixmonkey Feb 11 '13 at 20:42

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