Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I made a program that will take in 5 numbers and will use the first four to acquire the fifth number as a solution. Solutions can only contain positive integers, and the only operators acceptable are "+ - * /". There are 11 different way that the numbers and operators can be arranged with parentheses. Ex "(n @ n) @ n @ n" where n represents numbers and @ represents operators.

I have no problem finding all the solutions, my problem is removing "duplicates". I have been able to remove most duplicates using

%Seen = ();
@solutions = grep { ! $Seen{ $_ }++ } @solutions;

However I am unable to figure out a way to remove "duplicate" formulas.

Using 21 14 2 7 to acquire 34 gives us 4 solutions after the first duplicates have been removed. Here they are

21/7=3; 14+3=17; 2*17=34
21/7=3; 3+14=17; 2*17=34
21/7=3; 3+14=17; 17*2=34
21/7=3; 14+3=17; 17*2=34

My teacher considers these mathematically the same and as such all four of them are just 1 solution. What I can't figure out how to do is find these "duplicates" and remove them. Any help is appreciated, thank you.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A more generic form of the dedupping code you used is

grep !$seen{key($_)}++, ...

In this case, key would be

sub key {
   ( my $key = $_[0] ) =~ s/(\d+)([*+])(\d+)/ $1 < $3 ? "$1$2$3" : "$3$2$1" /eg;
   return $key;
}

In your case, you might want to simply normalise your inputs first

sub normalise(_) {
   ( my $s = $_[0] ) =~ s/(\d+)([*+])(\d+)/ $1 < $3 ? "$1$2$3" : "$3$2$1" /eg;
   return $s;
}

@solutions = grep !$seen{$_}++, map normalise, @solutions;
share|improve this answer
    
I believe you want the comparisons to be $1 < $3, not $1 < $2. –  jwodder Feb 8 '13 at 20:33
    
@jwodder, Fixed. –  ikegami Feb 8 '13 at 20:40
    
I really like this solution, but I can't seem to edit its format. Right now it would return something like "3+10=13 1+4=5; 13-5=8" however I would prefer it to return "10+3=13; 4+1=5; 1-5=8" I tried editing it myself by changing the ternary check and the values but I can't seem to figure out a solution (I feel pretty stupid...) –  Cardon Fry Feb 8 '13 at 21:20
    
If you want the larger first, use the second solution and simply change < to >. –  ikegami Feb 8 '13 at 22:19
    
I figured out the problem, I wasn't using map right. @solutions = grep !$seen{$_}++, map normalise($_), @solutions; works but @solutions = grep !$seen{$_}++, map normalise, @solutions; doesn't. –  Cardon Fry Feb 8 '13 at 22:48

For example, for commutative operations, only consider x @ y where x <= y. This way, 2 * 17 is possible, but 17 * 2 is not.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.