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A system wraps lines in a log file if they exceed X characters. I am trying to extract various data from the log, but first I need to combine all the split lines so gawk can parse the fields as a single record.

For example:

2012/11/01 field1 field2 field3 field4 fi
eld5 field6 field7
2012/11/03 field1 field2 field3
2012/12/31 field1 field2 field3 field4 fi
eld5 field6 field7 field8 field9 field10 
field11 field12 field13
2013/01/10 field1 field2 field3
2013/01/11 field1 field2 field3 field4

I want to return

2012/11/01 field1 field2 field3 field4 field5 field6 field7
2012/11/03 field1 field2 field3
2012/12/31 field1 field2 field3 field4 field5 field6 field7 field8 field9 field10 field11 field12 field13
2013/01/10 field1 field2 field3
2013/01/11 field1 field2 field3 field4

The actual max line length in my case is 130. I'm reluctant to test for that length and use getline to join the next line, in case there is a entry that is exactly 130 chars long.

Once I've cleaned up the log file, I'm also going to want to extract all the relevant events, where "relevant" may involve criteria like:

  • 'foo' is anywhere in any field in the record
  • field2 ~ /bar|dtn/
  • if field1 ~ /xyz|abc/ && field98 == "0001"

I'm wondering if I will need to run two successive gawk programs, or if I can combine all of this into one.

I'm a gawk newbie and come from a non-Unix

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1  
You can do it all in one awk command. You threw us (well, me at least) by asking for a script to combine lines, I didn't even notice the last part about what you really want to do with the data which makes the "can I combine lines" stuff redundant. –  Ed Morton Feb 9 '13 at 2:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
$ awk '{printf "%s%s",($1 ~ "/" ? rs : ""),$0; rs=RS} END{print ""}' file
2012/11/01 field1 field2 field3 field4 field5 field6 field7
2012/11/03 field1 field2 field3
2012/12/31 field1 field2 field3 field4 field5 field6 field7 field8 field9 field10 field11  field12 field13
2013/01/10 field1 field2 field3
2013/01/11 field1 field2 field3 field4

Now that I've noticed you don't actually want to just print recombined records, here's an alternative way to do that that's more amenable to test on the recompiled record ("s" in this script:

$ awk 'NR>1 && $1~"/"{print s; s=""} {s=s $0} END{print s}' file

Now with that structure, instead of just printing s you can perform tests on s, for example (note "foo" in 3rd record):

$ cat file
2012/11/01 field1 field2 field3 field4 fi
eld5 field6 field7
2012/11/03 field1 field2 field3
2012/12/31 field1 field2 foo field4 fi
eld5 field6 field7 field8 field9 field10
field11 field12 field13
2013/01/10 field1 field2 field3
2013/01/11 field1 field2 field3 field4

$ awk '
function tst(rec,     flds,nf,i) {
   nf=split(rec,flds)
   if (rec ~ "foo") {
      print rec
      for (i=1;i<=nf;i++)
         print "\t",i,flds[i]
   }
}
NR>1 && $1~"/" { tst(s); s="" }
{ s=s $0 }
END { tst(s) }
' file
2012/12/31 field1 field2 foo field4 field5 field6 field7 field8 field9 field10 field11 field12 field13
         1 2012/12/31
         2 field1
         3 field2
         4 foo
         5 field4
         6 field5
         7 field6
         8 field7
         9 field8
         10 field9
         11 field10
         12 field11
         13 field12
         14 field13
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant. I knew when reading through all the gawk commands and examples that there would likely be this coldly efficient one-liner that did exactly what I needed (to combine the lines) without all kinds of tests and conditions. You nailed that one. And yes, your second example looks like what I will need to process the records. One concern I have is that some of the records are 700 chars wide with 125+ fields. I wonder if split can handle that many. –  Dave Nicks Feb 9 '13 at 12:14
    
won't be a problem. –  Ed Morton Feb 9 '13 at 21:35
gawk '{ gsub( "\n", "" ); printf $0 RT }
    END { print }' RS='\n[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]/[0-9][0-9]/[0-9][0-9]' input

This can be somewhat simplified with:

gawk --re-interval '{ gsub( "\n", "" ); printf $0 RT }
    END { print }' RS='\n[0-9]{4}/[0-9]{2}/[0-9]{2}' input
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r ':a;$!N;\#\n[0-9]{4}/[0-9]{2}/[0-9]{2}#!{s/\n//;ta};P;D' file
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Here's a slightly bigger Perl solution which also handles the additional filtering (as you tagged this perl as well):

root@virtualdeb:~# cat combine_and_filter.pl 
#!/usr/bin/perl -n 

if (m!^2\d{3}/\d{2}/\d{2} !){
    print $prevline if $prevline =~ m/field13/;
    $prevline = $_;
}else{
    chomp($prevline);
    $prevline .= $_
}


root@virtualdeb:~# perl combine_and_filter < /tmp/in.txt
2012/12/31 field1 field2 field3 field4 field5 field6 field7 field8 field9 field10 field11 field12 field13
share|improve this answer
    
I'll confess that I tagged it perl only because there seem to be a lot of awk/gawk users in the perl universe, and I wasn't sure I'd get many responses if it was just tagged awk/gawk. Somehow my original post was truncated where I explained that... ;) –  Dave Nicks Feb 9 '13 at 12:20

this may work for you:

awk --re-interval '/^[0-9]{4}\//&&s{print s;s=""}{s=s""sprintf($0)}END{print s}' file

test with your example:

kent$  echo "2012/11/01 field1 field2 field3 field4 fi
eld5 field6 field7
2012/11/03 field1 field2 field3
2012/12/31 field1 field2 field3 field4 fi
eld5 field6 field7 field8 field9 field10 
field11 field12 field13
2013/01/10 field1 field2 field3
2013/01/11 field1 field2 field3 field4"|awk --re-interval '/^[0-9]{4}\//&&s{print s;s=""}{s=s""sprintf($0)}END{print s}'
2012/11/01 field1 field2 field3 field4 field5 field6 field7
2012/11/03 field1 field2 field3
2012/12/31 field1 field2 field3 field4 field5 field6 field7 field8 field9 field10 field11 field12 field13
2013/01/10 field1 field2 field3
2013/01/11 field1 field2 field3 field4
share|improve this answer
1  
don't do sprintf($0) as it does nothing if $0 does not contain a printf formatting character but then it gives you a 'ran out" error if $0 does contain a formatting character. Always use both the format field and the data field when using [s]printf on input data. Doing string concatenation with the null string (s=s""...) also does nothing. –  Ed Morton Feb 9 '13 at 0:25
    
@EdMorton thx for the comment. good comment! +1 –  Kent Feb 9 '13 at 2:00

Here is a very short script to acccomplish this.

sed '/^[[:digit:]]/ { :r N; /\n\([^[:digit:]]\)/ s:: \1:g; tr; } ' FILE

Are you happy with it in this form ?

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