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What is the big o notation here? An explanation would be appreciated. Thanks.

public static int[] mystery1(int[] list) {

  int[] result = new int[2 * list.length];
  for (int i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
    result[2 * i] = list[i] / 2 + list[i] % 2;
    result[2 * i + 1] = list[i] / 2;
  }

  return result;

}
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closed as too localized by Etienne de Martel, Puppy, Rapptz, millimoose, Tom Walters Feb 8 '13 at 21:10

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Is that homework? –  Etienne de Martel Feb 8 '13 at 20:43
1  
Too localized.. –  Puppy Feb 8 '13 at 20:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It is O(n), where n is the length of the list. You go through the entire list once in any case.

The number of arithmetic operations are:

  • 2n multiplications
  • 2n additions
  • 2n divitions
  • n modulo operations

This is not counting the arithmetic operations for implementing the for loop.

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O(n)

The amount of commands isn't so important as the control structures (loops) you use. If you consider the function, it only has one loop. That loop uses the length of your list (n) as the number of iterations. If the list doubles in length, so does the amount of time it takes for your loop to complete.

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1  
Well, it's not only loops. You also have to consider the non-primitive operations (especially recursive calls) you're using (especially recursion can be a bit painful for estimating the complexity at times). –  Cubic Feb 8 '13 at 20:41
    
Good point, anything that allows program flow to go anywhere besides A->B has the potential to add complexity to operations of a function/algorithm. –  TheCapn Feb 8 '13 at 21:46

Big O represents the worst case scenario. Because you can't compare the time two different computers will take to perform an operation, Big O applies to the number of operations an algorithm will perform. An operation can be anything from a method call to a variable assignment.

Going through your code

 int[] result = new int[2 * list.length]; 
  for (int i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
    result[2 * i] = list[i] / 2 + list[i] % 2; 
    result[2 * i + 1] = list[i] / 2; 
  }

  return result;

The heavy load is in the for loop. Because you loop list.length times, your big O for this method is O(list.length). However, for thoroughness, you do have other operations you can count. When you assign a new int array, you count that. When you calculate the index in the array result as 2 * i, you count that too. However, because these operations take a constant amount of time, they get swallowed up in the variable time the loop takes.

You should read your notes, but you will learn that there are different levels of complexity, constant, linear, logarithmic, etc.

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1  
"Big O represents the worst case scenario." Not really. It's an approximation of the asymptotic behavior of the runtime vs. length of the input. Formally Big O means an upper bound, though in colloquial use it usually means "upper and lower bound". –  Cubic Feb 8 '13 at 20:43
    
To me an upper bound is the worst possible (time, let's say). –  Sotirios Delimanolis Feb 8 '13 at 20:45
    
@Cubic Isn't the lower bound the small o? –  user000001 Feb 8 '13 at 20:46
    
Lower bound is Big Omega –  Sotirios Delimanolis Feb 8 '13 at 20:47
    
Upper and Lower bound is Big Theta. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Feb 8 '13 at 20:47

It is O(n). because there is only one for loop iteration. which is dependent on length of the array and will grow linearly.

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