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Got a question for you all. Many of you will answer 'it makes no difference' but I'm somewhat adamant there is a difference due to the wording of the question:

'Which class uses the least amount of memory?'

They're asking for a singular answer - there must be one! I've had a chat with a previous Microsoft intern and he's adamant there is no answer.

Maybe some would care to offer their thoughts?

Which class uses the least amount of memory?

class A 
{
    float duration;
    char code;
    int count;
    bool enabled;
};

class B 
{
    float duration;
    int count;
    char code;
    bool enabled;
};

class C
{
    char code;
    int count;
    bool enabled;
    float duration;
};

class D
{
    bool enabled;
    float duration;
    char code;
    int count;
};
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closed as not constructive by Barmar, Sudarshan, Steven Penny, Alastair Pitts, Fuzzical Logic Feb 11 '13 at 6:07

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1  
Sometimes, the compiler inserts padding because it is a requirement by the architecture or because it allows faster access. Anyway, the size can't be specified without specifying an implementation. –  AraK Feb 8 '13 at 20:39
    
Which uses the least? How about you use sizeof and find out (for that compiler)? –  chris Feb 8 '13 at 20:39
    
Perhaps you should read about Data Structure Alignment –  GWW Feb 8 '13 at 20:40
    
The class that the compiler has arranged the members such that it uses the least amount of padding. Which one that is [or if they are indeed all the same - which is one valid option according to the C++ standard], depends on the architecture of the processor. There are also some variations not listed above that under some circumstances would use less memory, possibly. –  Mats Petersson Feb 8 '13 at 20:42
    
Good luck with your job hunting, as I expect this is an "interview/test for job application" question. –  Mats Petersson Feb 8 '13 at 20:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

On MSVC2010 I get

A = 16 bytes B = 12 bytes C = 16 bytes D = 16 bytes

this is probably due to alignment of the different types. Since char and bool are both small they share a DWORD.

However this is compiler and platform independent. There is nothing stopping a compiler implementer from making them all the same size or making a char 64 bytes or whatever. The requirements of the standard are quite lax about this kind of thing.

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They appear to have been quite lazy when asking the question I suppose. As others said (and as my coursemates and I said), they should have given a compiler really. Thanks for your help :) –  DerryHolt Feb 8 '13 at 21:49

Answer E, this one :-)

class E
{
    float duration;
    char code;
    int count;
    bool enabled;
} __attribute__((packed));

Nothing can be said for other examples, it really depends of the compiler, arch, ...

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