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I want to write a function named bitCount() in the file: bitcount.c that returns the number of bits in the binary representation of its unsigned integer argument.

Here is what I have so far:

      #include <stdio.h>
      int bitCount (unsigned int n);
      int main ( ) {
        printf ("# 1-bits in base 2 representation of %u = %d, should be 0\n",
          0, bitCount (0));
        printf ("# 1-bits in base 2 representation of %u = %d, should be 1\n",
          1, bitCount (1));
        printf ("# 1-bits in base 2 representation of %u = %d, should be 16\n",
          2863311530u, bitCount (2863311530u));
        printf ("# 1-bits in base 2 representation of %u = %d, should be 1\n",
          536870912, bitCount (536870912));
        printf ("# 1-bits in base 2 representation of %u = %d, should be 32\n",
          4294967295u, bitCount (4294967295u));
        return 0;
      }
      int bitCount (unsigned int n) {
        /* your code here */
      }

Okay, when I just run this I get:
# 1-bits in base 2 representation of 0 = 1, should be 0
# 1-bits in base 2 representation of 1 = 56, should be 1
# 1-bits in base 2 representation of 2863311530 = 57, should be 16
# 1-bits in base 2 representation of 536870912 = 67, should be 1
# 1-bits in base 2 representation of 4294967295 = 65, should be 32

RUN SUCCESSFUL (total time: 14ms)

It doesn't return the correct numbers of bits.

What's the best way to return the number of bits in the binary representation of its unsigned integer argument. In C?

share|improve this question
    
what did you try in bitCount() ? –  ogzd Feb 8 '13 at 20:42
3  
I think you're missing "your code here". –  Hot Licks Feb 8 '13 at 20:49
1  
Would you be allowed to use __builtin_popcount? –  harold Feb 12 '13 at 17:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
 int bitCount(unsigned int n) {

    int counter = 0;
    while(n) {
        counter += n % 2;
        n >>= 1;
    }
    return counter;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, could you explain a bit more too? would be nice like i can cleaerly read your code, but I don't understand why it works –  user2054534 Feb 8 '13 at 20:50
1  
According to the "-1", I should leave the understanding part to you as a practice –  ogzd Feb 8 '13 at 20:51
    
i didn't downvote it it won't even let me vote "vote up requires 15 reputation" "vote down requires 125" –  user2054534 Feb 8 '13 at 20:59
2  
Think about what each line does, it should become obvious. This is how you learn. –  Barmar Feb 8 '13 at 21:00
    
i don't understand what n>>=1; does though any hint? –  user2054534 Feb 8 '13 at 21:09

Turns out there are some pretty sophisticated ways to compute this as answered here.

The following impl (I learned way back) simply loops knocking off the least significant bit on each iteration.

int bitCount(unsigned int n) {

  int counter = 0;
  while(n) {
    counter ++;
    n &= (n - 1);
  }
  return counter;
}
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