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I am trying to implement an algorithm in SQL (transact sql) and finding it difficult given my current abilities. I have tried to strip the problem down to the esstentials. The basic idea behind this algorithm is that a user is planning out their budget for lets say a month. They have a good idea of both how much and when money is coming and going. It is the middle of the month. The question is: based on the current obligations, for the rest of the month, what is the worst position the account is going to be in?

For example looking at the time line below let's say

Today = 15th
Util  = 17th
B-day = 19th
Cable = 22nd
Wages = 25th

On the 17th the account will be $150 less than today. On the 19th the account will be $100 more than today. On the 22nd the account will be $25 less than today. On the 25th the account will be $975 more than today.

So in this example the query would return -$150.

Note: I only care about negative values being returned. If it is negative that means that you have obligations and should not spend that amount. If it is positive it does not matter. You can not spend money not yet in your account.

|                                   |                                             |
|          ^            ^           |    ^            ^                           |
|          |Rent(-500)  |Phone(-50) |    |Util(-150)  |Cable(-125)                |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|        ^                          |       ^                     ^               |
|        |Wages(+1000)              |       |B-day(+250)          |Wages(+1000)   |
|                                   |                                             |
Past                                Today                                         Future

A simple table that we can use for this problem:

create table MoneyFlow
(
    fiscalEventID int not null, 
    value money,
    transactionDate date
)

One more way to look at it. How do you do the following algorithm in SQL?

Algorithm
  Input:  Start date, End date
  Output: Worst position the account is going to be in in the future.

  WorstPosition = 0 //only want worst position if it is negative.
  For each date D between start date and end date where a transaction takes place
     Position_D = Sum deposits and withdrawls between start date and D
         If Position_D < WorstPosition
     WorstPosition =  Position_D 

  return WorstPosition



One more note the database I am using is Sybase

Let me know if you need clarification of any details. Thanks!

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2  
Kudos on the clarity and thoroughness in asking a rather complex question. –  Paul Sasik Sep 25 '09 at 16:07
    
Btw, this problem sounds like it could possibly be homework. Please mark it as such if it is. –  Paul Sasik Sep 25 '09 at 16:16
    
I agree and that this would make a good homework question. I used the example of 'budget' to hide most of the nasty business details. For example in the problem I am working on there is no end of month being passed in. The future space ends at the date of the last withdrawal transaction. Also, I would have had to have added something like 'Budget Categories' –  Jon Sep 25 '09 at 17:47

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It looks to me like you're trying to create a running total, then select the smallest running value from the running total.

The following is not pretty, but it avoids cursors.

Start with the following to populate your table:

CREATE TABLE #temp
    (someDate datetime
    ,amount decimal)

INSERT INTO #temp (someDate, amount)
SELECT '2009-01-01', 1000 UNION ALL
SELECT '2009-01-02', -500 UNION ALL
SELECT '2009-01-03', -50 UNION ALL
SELECT '2009-01-04', -150 UNION ALL
SELECT '2009-01-05', 250 UNION ALL
SELECT '2009-01-06', -125 UNION ALL
SELECT '2009-01-07', 1000

Here's a simple query to get the minimum running totals:

SELECT
    TOP 1
    base.someDate
    ,runningTotal =
        (SELECT sum(derived.amount)
        FROM #temp derived
        WHERE derived.someDate <= base.someDate)
FROM #temp base
ORDER BY runningTotal ASC
share|improve this answer
    
For small amounts of data, this is probably better than cursor, but when the number of rows increases I think it will lead to problems. (see other comment about hidden rbar) –  Brimstedt Sep 25 '09 at 16:33
    
@Brimstedt: My first solution was actually similar to yours, but you posted before I did ;) However, you're analysis is entirely correct: excluding optimizations performed by the database engine, each row requires evaluating all the rows which come before it. So the performance is equivalent to O(1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + ... n) = O(n(n+1)/2) = O(n^2), so we'll see problems if the dataset gets too big (n > 5000). –  Juliet Sep 25 '09 at 17:03

Im not sure about Sybases T-SQL, but MS SQL's dialect you could use a trick like the following.

Note though that although it works, Im not sure it's documented behaviour. To be real sure you should probably use a cursor like psasik suggests.

SET NOCOUNT ON

CREATE TABLE MoneyFlow
(
    fiscalEventID INT NOT NULL, 
    value MONEY,
    transactionDate DATETIME
)
go

INSERT INTO MoneyFlow VALUES(1, 1000, '2009-08-25')
INSERT INTO MoneyFlow VALUES(1, -500, '2009-08-30')
INSERT INTO MoneyFlow VALUES(1, -50, '2009-09-01')

-- Today

INSERT INTO MoneyFlow VALUES(1, -150, '2009-09-17') -- -150
INSERT INTO MoneyFlow VALUES(1, +250, '2009-09-19') -- +100 
INSERT INTO MoneyFlow VALUES(1, -125, '2009-09-22') --  -25
INSERT INTO MoneyFlow VALUES(1, 1000, '2009-09-25') -- +975
--INSERT INTO MoneyFlow VALUES(1, -2000, '2009-09-25') -- -1025



GO

DECLARE @curr   MONEY
,   @min	MONEY

SELECT  @curr = 0
,   @min = 0

SELECT  @curr = @curr + value
,   @min = CASE 
    		WHEN	@curr < @min THEN @curr
    		ELSE	@min
    	END
FROM    MoneyFlow f (NOLOCK)
WHERE   f.transactionDate > '2009-09-15'

SELECT  @min

GO
DROP TABLE MoneyFlow
share|improve this answer
    
+1: obscure hack can be forgiven by the O(n) solution :) –  Juliet Sep 25 '09 at 17:05

This is MS TSQL but I imagine it will be similar in sybase

SELECT MIN(lmv.value)
FROM @moneyFlow mv
JOIN (
    SELECT SUM(mv.value) as [VALUE], lmv.fiscalEventID
    FROM @moneyFlow mv
    JOIN @moneyFlow lmv ON mv.transactionDate <= lmv.transactionDate
    WHERE mv.transactionDate >= @Start AND mv.transactionDate <= @End
      AND lmv.transactionDate >= @Start AND lmv.transactionDate <= @End
    GROUP BY lmv.fiscalEventID
) lmv ON mv.fiscalEventID = lmv.fiscalEventID
WHERE lmv.value < 0


DECLARE @Start DATETIME
SET @Start = '1/2/09'
DECLARE @End DATETIME
SET @End = '1/6/09'
DECLARE @moneyFlow TABLE (
    fiscalEventID int not null,   
    value money,   
    transactionDate DATETIME
)

INSERT @moneyFlow VALUES (1, 1000, '1/1/09')
INSERT @moneyFlow VALUES (2, -500, '1/2/09')
INSERT @moneyFlow VALUES (3,  -50, '1/3/09')
INSERT @moneyFlow VALUES (4, -150, '1/4/09')
INSERT @moneyFlow VALUES (5,  250, '1/5/09')
INSERT @moneyFlow VALUES (6, -125, '1/6/09')
INSERT @moneyFlow VALUES (7, 1000, '1/7/09')
share|improve this answer

At the risk of being told I'm not answering the question, why is it necessary to be done in SQL? It seems like business logic that might fit better in an application layer and even have potential to be re-used elsewhere.

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1  
Do you want to recode the algorithm for every application layer language change? I don't... –  OMG Ponies Sep 25 '09 at 16:11
    
That's an interesting point Gratzy but doing this as a stored proc or UDF in SQL will actually make for a reusable bit of logic. For example, how would you reuse a Java class in Crystal Report to make this calculation? Well, you could, but it'd be an ugly hack. Leaving it in your db will allow for the widest possible reuse. –  Paul Sasik Sep 25 '09 at 16:15
    
It just seems it would be easier to code and maintain in a language other than SQL. I don't believe that leaving it in the db allows for the widest possible reuse either. If that were the case wouldn't all business logic reside there? –  Gratzy Sep 25 '09 at 16:20
    
@Gratzy: "just seems" doesn't hold any water. 99.9% of buiness logic will reside in the database - that's what the data model is for, why normalization is necessary. –  OMG Ponies Sep 25 '09 at 16:33
1  
@rexem you really believe that 99.9% of business logic resides in the database? You believe that the data model defines business logic? If that's what you believe then I have no argument for you. –  Gratzy Sep 25 '09 at 16:37

I'm not familiar with Sybase, so I don't know whether you could do this or not, but I would try something like the following:

select a.transactionDate as balanceDate
     , (select sum(value)
          from MoneyFlow b
         where b.transactionDate <= a.transactionDate
       ) as balance
  from MoneyFlow a
 order by 2

That should show you the day where the balance bottoms out. You may need to adjust this of there is a starting date and starting balance. Likewise, if you only want the one day returned, you will need to restrict the output just to the first row.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is a hidden rbar ? sqlservercentral.com/articles/T-SQL/61539 –  Brimstedt Sep 25 '09 at 16:31
    
Yes, I think you might be right, but can you suggest a SQL-only solution that isn't? –  Jeremy Bourque Sep 25 '09 at 17:02
    
i think the most reliable way would be a cursor (although it hurts to say so). I've also posted a hack that probably works ;-) –  Brimstedt Sep 25 '09 at 17:20

This query gives running totals:

 Select M1.TransactionDate, Sum(M2.Money)
 From MoneyFlow M1
     Join MoneyFlow M2
          On M2.TransactionDate <= M1.TransactionDate
 Group By M1.TransactionDate

You want the smallest of these, So this SQL should do that..

Select Min(RunBalance) From
 (Select M1.TransactionDate, Sum(M2.Money) RunBalance
  From MoneyFlow M1
     Join MoneyFlow M2
          On M2.TransactionDate <= M1.TransactionDate
  Group By M1.TransactionDate) Z

To restrict the ouput to negative values add a predivate.
(But SQL should only generate one row, so if there are no negatives this will cause null output...)

 Select Min(RunBalance) From
 (Select M1.TransactionDate, Sum(M2.Money) RunBalance
  From MoneyFlow M1
     Join MoneyFlow M2
          On M2.TransactionDate <= M1.TransactionDate
  Group By M1.TransactionDate) Z
 Where RunBalance > 0
share|improve this answer
select min(Value)
from (
    select sum(value) as Value
    from MoneyFlow
    group by transactionDate 
    where transactionDate between @startdate and @enddate
) a
where min(Value) < 0
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