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Let us say I have a X.clojurescript and a X.clojure namespace. Everything in X.clojurescript is Clojurescript code, everything in X.clojure is Clojure code. Unfortunately, I cannot define macros directly in Clojurescript, I have to define them in Clojure and then bring them into a Clojurescript namespace using

(ns X.clojurescript.abc
  (:require-macros [X.clojure.def :as clj]))

This is fine. However, what if the macro (defined in X.clojure) is going to need to reference something defined in a Clojurescript namespace (X.clojurescript)? The problem is that the Clojure compiler does not look in my Clojurescript namespace (a separate directory) when resolving other namespaces.

I have gotten around this problem by simply creating a namespace in my Clojure code that has the same namespace and needed definition as exist in Clojurescript, but this seems kind of stupid. So, for instance, if I need X.clojurescript.abc.y in my macro, I will just create an additional namespace on the Clojure side that defs a dummy y in my Clojure version of X.clojurescript.abc; kind of dumb.

How do I deal with a macro that needs to refer to something on the Clojurescript side?

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Make your macro such that it takes all the required things from clojurescript as parameter. If you could add some code it will be much easier to answer your sepcific query –  Ankur Feb 9 '13 at 7:35
2  
I don't think I understand your question. Your macro has to generate the code that will then be evaluated in clojurescript. So if you have to reference any clojurescript def wouldn't it be enough to generate the symbol in the expansion of the macro? –  KIMA Feb 27 '13 at 19:47
    
refer to something on the Clojurescript side you need that at macro expansion time or this will be something that will be emitted in the output code? –  Ankur May 13 '13 at 9:45
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1 Answer 1

The only time a macro needs a specific namespace at the time of definition is if the macro is using code from said namespace to generate the list of symbols it will return.

you can follow along with these examples in the repl:

(defmacro foo
  [a]
  `(bar/bar ~a))

the definition of foo will compile even though bar is not a defined namespace

(foo :a)

calling foo will now fail because you have not defined the bar namespace, or the function bar yet

(ns bar)
(defn bar
  [x]
  [x x])

defines bar in the bar namespace

(ns user)
(foo :a)

=> [:a :a]

Notice that bar does not need to exist at the time of foo's definition. In fact the namespace does not even need to exist at the time of foo's definition.

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Compilation is one thing, but what about requiring a library on the ClojureScript side? In your example above, it seems like you need to require the bar namespace in the ClojureScript module that is calling the foo macro, which means the calling module has to know implementation details about the macro. –  Kevin Albrecht May 13 '13 at 16:05
    
An example of the problem I mentioned is experienced by the Hiccups library. You can see their solution here, which is kind of hacky: github.com/teropa/hiccups#usage –  Kevin Albrecht May 13 '13 at 16:17
1  
I think this is a fundamental problem with clojurescript's implementation as it exists. I am suggesting what I believe to be the best way to work with it, but I do understand that it is less than ideal. But fundamentally this is no different from how one would use macros in pure clojure code - the macro looks up the functions it generates symbols for at invocation time. –  noisesmith May 13 '13 at 16:30
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