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In my code, I deal with an array that has some entries with many objects nested inside one another, where as some do not. It looks something like the following:

// where this array is hundreds of entries long, with a mix
// of the two examples given
var test = [{'a':{'b':{'c':"foo"}}}, {'a': "bar"}];

This is giving me problems because I need to iterate through the array at times, and the inconsistency is throwing me errors like so:

for (i=0; i<test.length; i++) {
    // ok on i==0, but 'cannot read property of undefined' on i==1
    console.log(a.b.c);
}

I am aware that I can say if(a.b){ console.log(a.b.c)}, but this is extraordinarily tedious in cases where there are up to 5 or 6 objects nested within one another. Is there any other (easier) way that I can have it ONLY do the console.log if it exists, but without throwing an error?

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3  
The error is probably a regular Javascript exception, so try the try..catch statement. That said, an array that contains wildly heterogenous elements looks like a design issue to me. –  millimoose Feb 8 '13 at 22:17
2  
If your structure isn't consistent across the items, then what's wrong with checking for existence? Really, I'd use if ("b" in a && "c" in a.b). It may be "tedious", but that's what you get for inconsistency...normal logic. –  Ian Feb 8 '13 at 22:21
2  
Why would you access non-existing properties, why don't you know how the objects look like? –  Bergi Feb 8 '13 at 22:22
1  
I can understand why somebody would not want an error to crash everything. You can't always rely on an object's properties to exist or not exist. If you have something in place that can handle the event that the object is malformed, then you're code is much more efficient and less fragile. –  SSH This Apr 9 '13 at 20:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you are doing raises an exception and logically so.

You can always do

try{
   window.a.b.c
}catch(e){
   console.log("YO",e)
}

But I wouldn't, instead think of your use case.

Why are you accessing data, 6 levels nested that you are unfamiliar of? What use case justifies this?

Usually, you'd like to actually validate what sort of object you're dealing with.

Also, on a side node you should not use statements like if(a.b) because it will return false if a.b is 0 or even if it is "0". Instead check if a.b != undefined

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In regards to your first edit: It is justified; I am dealing with JSON structured database entries, such that the objects will scale multiple levels of fields (ie. entries.users.messages.date etc., where not all cases have data entered) –  Ari Feb 8 '13 at 22:23
    
"it will return true if a.b is 0" - nope. typeof a.b === "undefined" && a.b!=null - unnecessary to do the second part after the first, and it makes more sense to just do if ("b" in a) –  Ian Feb 8 '13 at 22:23
    
@Ian yeah, I obviously meant it the other way around, it will return false even if a.b is "0". Nice catch –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Feb 8 '13 at 22:24
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum Sounds good, wasn't sure if you meant that. Also, I think you want typeof a.b !== "undefined" && a.b!=null` - notice the !== –  Ian Feb 8 '13 at 22:26
1  
If you don't want to tedium of a.b && a.b.c && console.log(a.b.c) then this is the only way to consistently log unknowns. –  Brian Cray Feb 8 '13 at 22:31

If I am understanding your question correctly, you want the safest way to determine if an object contains a property.

The easiest way is using the "in" statement.

window.a = "aString";
//window should have 'a' property
//lets test if it exists
if ("a" in window){
    //true
 }

if ("b" in window){
     //false
 }

Of course you can nest this as deep as you want

if ("a" in window.b.c) { }

Not sure if this helps.

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This was useful to me, thank you –  SSH This Apr 9 '13 at 20:42

Function to cycle through properties. If that properties is an object (with other properties) call it again recursively:

function consoleLog(val){
  for (var p in val){
    console.log(p);
    if (typeof(p) === 'object')
      consoleLog(p)
  }
}

Or if you only want to log the end nodes:

function consoleLog(val){
  for (var p in val){
    if (typeof(p) === 'object')
      consoleLog(p)
    else
      console.log(p);
  }
}

Then:

for (i=0; i<test.length; i++) {
    consoleLog(test[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
this would still break if he called consoleLog(a.b.c) because it would still try to access c. –  Brian Cray Feb 8 '13 at 22:30

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