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Take a boolean filter operation like this which returns a copy of the resulting data set:

df[(df.age > 20) & (df.age < 30)]. 

Now From the resulting set I want to choose a random slice based on the index. So for eg. I might want 10th, 14th and 17th rows.

But I can't say

df[(df.age > 20) & (df.age < 30) & df.index.isin([10, 14, 17])] 

because the filtered index will be different. We can do this in 3 statements easily like this:

a = df[(df.age > 20) & (df.age < 30)]. 
a = a.reset_index()
result = a.index.isin([10, 14, 17])

That is a huge copy operation on potentially the whole data set (million rows), and then a reset operation.

I'd like to do this in one step without the copy operation. Any comments/insights appreciated.

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2 Answers

One improvement on this is to use irow, which grabs only the rows in the specified integer positions:

a = df[(df.age > 20) & (df.age < 30)]
a.irow([10, 14, 17])

Note: this will throw an error if a does not have 17 rows.

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irow is cool. I hope it is an optimized lookup. I am starting to think my current requirement might not be supported in pandas. Although I suspect it is not too hard to modify to get this, I might be mistaken. The reason is because of the notation df[(df.age > 20) & (df.age < 30)][9:10] will fetch the 10th element exactly. So I suspect a lot of infrastructure to do this call is already in place. –  jason Feb 9 '13 at 3:09
    
@jason I don't think you can do that kind of "lazy" lookup, but I could be wrong. –  Andy Hayden Feb 9 '13 at 16:14
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Just use .ix:

In [1]: df = DataFrame(np.arange(20).reshape(5,4))

In [2]: df
Out[2]:
    0   1   2   3
0   0   1   2   3
1   4   5   6   7
2   8   9  10  11
3  12  13  14  15
4  16  17  18  19

Here I index the data frame where values of the first column are less than 12 and then use .ix to take the resulting 0th and 2nd rows:

In [3]: df[df[0] <12].ix[[0,2]]
Out[3]:
   0  1   2   3
0  0  1   2   3
2  8  9  10  11

UPDATE:

Ok, what about boolean indexing the index and then passing that to .ix?

In [1]: (df[0] < 12) | (df[0] > 12)
Out[1]:
0     True
1     True
2     True
3    False
4     True
Name: 0

Index the df.index using the above boolean series:

In [2]: df.index[(df[0] < 12) | (df[0] > 12)]
Out[2]: Int64Index([0, 1, 2, 4], dtype=int64)

Now, use the above in df.ix[]. Here, passing a 3 pulls back the originally indexed 4th row:

In [3]: df.ix[df.index[(df[0] < 12) | (df[0] > 12)][3]]
Out[3]:
0    16
1    17
2    18
3    19
Name: 4
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That would bring out based on existing index values, not the filtered index values. In your example, try df[df[0] > 8].ix[0,1], it will return NaN, although we have two rows in the result and we should be able to access them using .ix[0,1]. This is why the reset_index step is necessary. –  jason Feb 9 '13 at 3:02
    
ahh, duh, that was hasty of me. I've edited my response with a possibly convoluted followup... –  Zelazny7 Feb 9 '13 at 4:52
    
This certainly seems to get the job done. I am wondering if it has the lazy property, meaning: I wonder if df.index step is similar to df.reset_index() which would run through the entire list once which would defeat the purpose. I am thinking of timing it to see if this is the case or if it is infact lazy as required. –  jason Feb 11 '13 at 6:03
1  
It is not lazy like I suspected. On a 500K row matrix this operation took 1.17 seconds. (2.4ghz/core2). I suspect this way of accessing things is not supported by pandas at this point. This is one reason where environments like Haskell which take laziness very seriously are at an advantage. –  jason Feb 11 '13 at 21:47
    
Thanks for following up on that. Do you know if it's faster than the reset_index method? –  Zelazny7 Feb 11 '13 at 22:28
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