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I have a variable of type const int, but the parameters that it's dependent upon are of type double. When I try to cast this down from a 'double' to a 'const int', it doesn't work properly. For example, when N should be 991, it is entered as 990. I've tried several methods and only one has worked, but I'm not sure if this method is going to work all the time. Here are some methods that I have tried:

First method:

const int N = (Ls-1)/dx + 1;

Second Method:

const int N = static_cast<const int>((Ls-1)/dx) + 1;

Third Method:

double Z = (Ls-1)/dx + 1;
const int N = Z;

Fourth Method (only working method):

double Z = (Ls-1)/dx;
const int N = Z + 1;

Please note that dx is a value such that the remainder of (Ls-1)/dx will always be zero (i.e. it's always an integer value). Can anyway explain why the other methods aren't working so that I may understand type casting better?

EDIT: As requested, I'm uploading the entire code to show how everything is working:

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <fstream>
#include <cmath>
#include <algorithm>

#define pi 3.14159265

using namespace std;

//Define Fluid Properties
double rho_L = 998; //Liquid Density
double rho_LG = 828.9; //Liquid-Gas Density Ratio
double mu_L = 0.000798; //Liquid Viscosity
double mu_LG = 40.24; //Liquid-Gas Viscosity Ratio
double sigma = 0.0712; //Surface Tension
double nu_G = (mu_L/mu_LG)/(rho_L/rho_LG);

//Define Injector Properties
double Uinj = 56.7; //Injection Velocity
double Dinj = 0.0998; //Injector Diameter
double theta = 15.0*pi/180.0; //Spray Cone Angle
double L = 500.0*Dinj; //Atomization Length
double Ls = L/Dinj; //Normalized Atomization Length

//Define Solver Parameters
double K = 5294; //Viscous Dissipation Coefficient
double Eps = pow(10,-5); //Residual Error
double dx = 0.0001; //Step Size
double Ui = 10; //Initial Guess
//const int Z = static_cast<const int>((Ls-1)/dx + 1) + 1;
const int N = (Ls-1)/dx + 1;//Z;

double deriv (double U, double X, double delta, double m)
{
    double dudx;
    dudx = -(1.0/delta)*(1.0/U)*(U - sqrt(1.0 - U)/sqrt(m*X*X))*(U - sqrt(1.0 - U)/sqrt(m*X*X));
    return (dudx);
}

int main()
{
    //Declare Variables
    int max_step;
    double ERR;
    int step;
    double DEN;
    double SMD;
    double m;
    double Ug;
    double Re;
    double Cd;
    double delta;
    double K1;
    double K2;
    double K3;
    double K4;

    //Allocate Memory From Heap
    double *U = new double [N];
    double *X = new double [N];

    //Initialize Vectors and Variables
    DEN = 0.5*rho_L - (4.0/3.0)*K*(mu_L)/(Uinj*Dinj*Dinj)*L;

    m = 4.0/rho_LG*tan(theta)*tan(theta);

    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
    {
        X[i] = 1.0 + dx*i;
    }
    U[0] = 1.0;

    max_step = 1;
    ERR = 1;
    step = 0;
    while(abs(ERR) > Eps && step < max_step)
    {

        //Calculate Ug
        Ug = sqrt(1.0 - (Ui/Uinj))/sqrt(m*Ls*Ls)*Uinj;

        //Calculate SMD
        SMD = 6.0*sigma/(DEN*(Uinj*Uinj - Ui*Ui));

        //Calculate Re # and Drag Coefficient
        Re = abs(Ui-Ug)*SMD/nu_G;

        if(Re <= 0.01)
        {
            Cd = (0.1875) + (24.0/Re);
        }
        else if(Re > 0.01 && Re <= 260.0)
        {
            Cd = (24.0/Re)*(1.0 + 0.1315*pow(Re,(0.32 - 0.05*log10(Re))));
        }
        else
        {
            Cd = (24.0/Re)*(1.0 + 0.1935*pow(Re,0.6305));
        }

        //Determine New U
        delta = (4.0/3.0)*(1.0/Cd)*(rho_LG)*(SMD/Dinj);

        //RK4
        for (int i = 0; i < N-1; i++)
        {
            K1 = deriv(U[i],X[i],delta,m);
            K2 = deriv(U[i]+0.5*dx*K1,X[i]+0.5*dx,delta,m);
            K3 = deriv(U[i]+0.5*dx*K2,X[i]+0.5*dx,delta,m);
            K4 = deriv(U[i]+dx*K3,X[i+1],delta,m);
            U[i+1] = U[i] + dx/6.0*(K1 + 2.0*K2 + 2.0*K3 + K4);
            //if(i >= 0 && i <= 3)
                //cout << i << " " << K1 << " " << K2 << " " << K3 << " " << K4 << " " << U[i] << endl;
        }

        ERR = abs(U[N-1]*Uinj - Ui)/Ui;

        Ui = U[N-1]*Uinj;

        step = step + 1;
    }

    SMD = 6.0*sigma/(DEN*(Uinj*Uinj - Ui*Ui));

    cout << "U = " << Ui << endl;
    cout << "SMD = " << SMD << endl;
    cout << "DEN = " << DEN << endl;
    cout << "Ug = " << Ug << endl;
    cout << "m = " << m << endl;
    cout << "delta = " << delta << endl;
    cout << "Re = " << Re << endl;
    cout << "Cd = " << Cd << endl;
    cout << "U* = " << U[N-1] << endl;
    cout << "Error = " << ERR << endl;
    cout << "step = " << step << endl;

    //Output Data Into Text File
    ofstream outputdata("result-500-15.txt");
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
    {
        outputdata << X[i] << " " << U[i] << '\n';
    }
    outputdata.close();

    delete [] U;
    delete [] X;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
5  
It sounds like it might be a roundoff issue -- perhaps (Ls-1)/dx is actually (say) 990.999999999999, so it's effectively 991, but downcasting will truncate it to 990. What happens if you try static_cast<const int>((Ls-1)/dx + 0.01) + 1? –  ruakh Feb 8 '13 at 23:55
    
Currently, dx = 0.1, and Ls-1 = 99, so (Ls-1)/dx should be 990, but maybe it can't do 0.1 in binary? If I add 0.01, it does work, but will it always? –  user1562781 Feb 9 '13 at 0:01
    
Actually, now that I think about it, rounding shouldn't be a problem because including the '+1' should fix any rounding issues. –  user1562781 Feb 9 '13 at 0:40
    
The +1 will give you the wrong answer if Z winds up being an integer. You're better off with "const int N = Z + 0.5". That will fail if Z is negative, though. You're best off using a C standard library function, roundl(), for dealing with this sort of situation. –  Bob Murphy Feb 9 '13 at 2:52
    
I think I may have incorrectly described the equation. "N = (Ls - 1)/dx + 1" is actually what I'm solving. The +1 is part of the equation. I'm basically trying to find the number of points in a vector given a spacing (dx) and the beginning and end points (Ls-1). –  user1562781 Feb 9 '13 at 21:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your guess is correct: 0.1 doesn't have a finite expression in binary. This is a rather complex issue and has many corner cases that will not be solved in general by adding 0.01 as mentioned in your comment. (It highly depends on the values you expect etc.)

Your question suggests that the quotient is always supposed to be an integer. In that case, the right approach to maintain correct results is to not use any doubles to begin with (for Ls, dx, Z). Either use a fractional type (nothing built-in in C++, use your own or a library), an arbitrary-precision decimal type (again, use a library like gmp - sensible if you know all your numbers have a terminating decimal expression), or, easiest: If both Ls and dx are guaranteed to have at most n digits after the decimal point, multiply both by 10^n and use integral types.


Okay, your code is very different from what I expected. In this case, in my opinion, the right thing is to fix the number of steps N and calculate dx from that rather than the other way round:

const int N = 10000;
double dx = (Ls-1.0)/(double)(N-1);

If you want to start with a value for dx and choose N such that the calculated value for dx, ask the user when the program starts:

#include <cmath>

double dxestim;
cout << "dx should be close to: ";
cin >> dxestim;
cout << "Candidate values for N: " << endl;
int N1 = (int) floor((Ls-1)/dx + 1.0);
int N2 = (int) ceil((Ls-1)/dx + 1.0);
cout << N1 << " gives dx = " << (Ls-1.0)/(double)(N1-1) << endl;
cout << N2 << " gives dx = " << (Ls-1.0)/(double)(N2-1) << endl;
cout << "Please choose N: ";
cin >> N;
...
share|improve this answer
    
((Ls-1)/dx + 1) gives the length of an array from the end point (Ls) to the initial point (1) where (dx) is the spacing between each element. I choose (dx) in such a way that ((Ls-1)/dx + 1) is always a whole number, but unfortunately, I have to have (Ls) and (dx) as doubles because they are used elsewhere in the code. Or is it better that I upgrade them with explicit type casting later on? –  user1562781 Feb 9 '13 at 23:16
    
Hmmm. Hard to say without seeing the big picture, it's unclear to me whether they should be doubles or not. Given your description, how do you choose dx so that the quotient is an integer? Seems to me that this requires knowledge of what the integer is supposed to be, so you could save it at that point. –  us2012 Feb 10 '13 at 0:38
    
It's a mathematical solver, so dx needs to change in order for the solution to be stable. I choose it in such a way that (Ls-1)/dx will always be a whole number. I know exactly what the value of N needs to be beforehand, but I'd like to do it automatically so that I don't have to type it in by hand every time I change dx. I can upload the entire code, if it explains things better. –  user1562781 Feb 10 '13 at 4:37
1  
@user1562781 Okay, that is very different from what I was expecting. See my edit for what I would consider to be the easiest fix. –  us2012 Feb 10 '13 at 4:51
    
Yes, you should specify N and calculate dx from that, rather than the other way around. –  Bob Murphy Feb 10 '13 at 5:03

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