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I've googled, I've tested, and this has me at my wits end. I have a list of numbers I need to group by similarity. For instance, in a list of [1, 6, 9, 100, 102, 105, 109, 134, 139], 1 6 9 would be put into a list, 100, 102, 105, and 109 would be put into a list, and 134 and 139. I'm terrible at math, and I've tried and tried this, but I can't get it to work. To be explicit as possible, I wish to group numbers that are within 10 values away from one another. Can anyone help? Thanks.

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4  
You'll need to define "similarity" more precisely. Do you mean, have the same hundreds and tens digits? –  Ned Batchelder Feb 9 '13 at 1:26
    
I mean, digits that are within 10(or however many) values of each other. Sorry, tried to put this as explicitly as possible. –  Adam Magyar Feb 9 '13 at 1:28
1  
What if possible groups overlap? –  millimoose Feb 9 '13 at 1:30
3  
Suppose you have [56, 65, 66, 67]. What would the groups be? –  kojiro Feb 9 '13 at 1:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

There are many ways to do cluster analysis. One simple approach is to look at the gap size between successive data elements:

def cluster(data, maxgap):
    '''Arrange data into groups where successive elements
       differ by no more than *maxgap*

        >>> cluster([1, 6, 9, 100, 102, 105, 109, 134, 139], maxgap=10)
        [[1, 6, 9], [100, 102, 105, 109], [134, 139]]

        >>> cluster([1, 6, 9, 99, 100, 102, 105, 134, 139, 141], maxgap=10)
        [[1, 6, 9], [99, 100, 102, 105], [134, 139, 141]]

    '''
    data.sort()
    groups = [[data[0]]]
    for x in data[1:]:
        if abs(x - groups[-1][-1]) <= maxgap:
            groups[-1].append(x)
        else:
            groups.append([x])
    return groups

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import doctest
    print(doctest.testmod())
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And there's my solution. Thank you SO much. I'll study every character of this code, haha. –  Adam Magyar Feb 9 '13 at 1:42

This will find the groups:

nums = [1, 6, 9, 100, 102, 105, 109, 134, 139]
for k, g in itertools.groupby(nums, key=lambda n: n//10):
    print k, list(g)

0 [1, 6, 9]
10 [100, 102, 105, 109]
13 [134, 139]

Note that if nums isn't actually sorted as your sample shows, you'll need to sort it first.

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3  
The only thing I don't like about this approach is that [1, 6, 9, 99, 100, 134, 139] would group the 99 and 100 into different groups. It would be better to compute the differences between successive data points to determine where one cluster begins and the other ends. –  Raymond Hettinger Feb 9 '13 at 1:39
    
yeah unfortunately that's what happened when I tried this code ;/. Almost perfect. –  Adam Magyar Feb 9 '13 at 1:44
    
Yes, it was underspecified when I wrote it. –  Ned Batchelder Feb 9 '13 at 2:12
    
You can make this work… see my answer. But I'm not sure it's what you want in this case. (I'd still write it as a sequence of iterator transformations, just not groupby.) –  abarnert Mar 19 '13 at 4:33

First, you can easily convert any sequence into a sequence of pairs of adjacent items. Just tee it, shift it forward, and zip the unshifted and unshifted copies. The only trick is that you need to start with either (<something>, 1) or (139, <something>), because in this case we want not each pair of elements, but a pair for each element:

def pairify(it):
    it0, it1 = itertools.tee(it, 2)
    first = next(it0)
    return zip(itertools.chain([first, first], it0), it1)

(This isn't the simplest way to write it, but I think this may be the way that's most readable to people who aren't familiar with itertools.)

>>> a = [1, 6, 9, 100, 102, 105, 109, 134, 139]
>>> list(pairify(a))
[(1, 1), (1, 6), (6, 9), (9, 100), (100, 102), (102, 105), (105, 109), (109, 134), (134, 139)]

Then, with a slightly more complicated version of Ned Batchelder's key, you can just use groupby.

However, I think in this case this will end up being more complicated than an explicit generator that does the same thing.

def cluster(sequence, maxgap):
    batch = []
    for prev, val in pairify(sequence):
        if val - prev >= maxgap:
            yield batch
            batch = []
        else:
            batch.append(val)
    if batch:
        yield batch
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