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I have two instances of type IEnumerable as follows.

IEnumerable<Type1> type1 = ...;
IEnumerable<Type2> type2 = ...;

Both Type1 and Type2 contain a member called common, so even though they are of different class, we can still relate them like this.

type1[0].common == type2[4].common

I'm trying to filter away those elements of type1 that have no corresponding common value in type2 and create a dictionary based on one value from each. Right now, I do that by the following double loop.

Dictionary<String, String> intersection = ...;
foreach (Type1 t1 in type1)
  foreach(Type2 t2 in type2)
    if (t1.common == t2.common)
      intersection.Add(t1.Id, t2.Value);

Now, I've tried with LINQ but all the .Where, .Select and .ForEach just gave me headache. Is there a way to neatly perform the same operation using LINQ?

share|improve this question
    
LINQ is just going to enumerate anyway. Are you having performance issues? –  Blam Feb 9 '13 at 1:56
    
Nope. But the other programmers are laughing at me. :( They say I'm to tired to find the code and that's not possible. While I can admit the first, I refuse to agree to the latter. :) –  Andy J Feb 9 '13 at 2:07
1  
So what happens when you have a t1 that has two t2s that match? –  Eric Lippert Feb 9 '13 at 4:05
    
@Blam That's not true at all. Since this is a Join operation it can be implemented much more efficiently than two nested foreach operators. While you could do it better without LINQ, using the LINQ Join operator is both easier and noticeably more efficient. –  Servy Feb 9 '13 at 6:09
    
@AndreasJohansson You should be laughing at your co-workers if they think this isn't possible with LINQ. This is the textbook case of using Join; it does exactly what their asking. Clearly they're not very familiar with LINQ at all if they think it couldn't do this at all. –  Servy Feb 9 '13 at 6:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

When two sequences have something in common and you want to filter their product based on that commonality, the efficient query is a join. Suppose Type1 is Customer and Type2 is Order. Every customer has a CustomerID, and every order also has a CustomerID. Then you can say this.

var query = from customer in customers
            join order in orders 
              on customer.CustomerId equals order.CustomerId
            select new { customer.Name, order.Product };

Iterating that will give you a sequence of pairs consisting of every customer name that has an order, and all of their products. So if customer Suzy ordered a pancake and a pizza and customer Bob ordered a steak, you'd get these pairs.

Suzy, pancake
Suzy, pizza
Bob, steak

If instead you want those grouped so that every customer has a list of their orders, that's a group join.

var query = from customer in customers
            join order in orders 
              on customer.CustomerId equals order.CustomerId 
              into products
            select new { customer.Name, products };

Iterating that gives you pairs where the first item is the name and the second item is a sequence of products.

Suzy, { pancake, pizza }
Bob, { steak }
share|improve this answer
    
Pure gold, hihi! For this time, the first approach is just what I needed (I don't know how I couldn't set it up myself). But the othe one is new to me. Didn't know of the grouping but it will come in handy pretty soon. –  Andy J Feb 10 '13 at 9:49
    
I think posting the equivalent extension method calls in addition the the query expression would make it easier to understand what happens, and what the performance characteristics are. –  CodesInChaos Feb 10 '13 at 16:19

Another option would be joining. I did a quick console app below, but had to make up my own data. Hope I understood your question correctly.

public class Type1
{
    public string ID { get; set; }
    public Guid common { get; set; }
}
public class Type2
{
    public string Value { get; set; }
    public Guid common { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Guid CommonGuid = Guid.NewGuid();

        IEnumerable<Type1> EnumType1 = new List<Type1>()
        {
            new Type1() {
                ID = "first",
                common = CommonGuid
            },
            new Type1() {
                ID = "second",
                common = CommonGuid
            },
            new Type1() {
                ID = "third",
                common = Guid.NewGuid()
            }
        } as IEnumerable<Type1>;

        IEnumerable<Type2> EnumType2 = new List<Type2>()
        {
            new Type2() {
                Value = "value1",
                common = CommonGuid
            },
            new Type2() {
                Value = "value2",
                common = Guid.NewGuid()
            },
            new Type2() {
                Value = "value3",
                common = CommonGuid
            }
        } as IEnumerable<Type2>;

        //--The part that matters
        EnumType1                       //--First IEnumerable
            .Join(                      //--Command
                EnumType2,              //--Second IEnumerable
                outer => outer.common,  //--Key to join by from EnumType1
                inner => inner.common,  //--Key to join by from EnumType2
                (inner, outer) => new { ID = inner.ID, Value = outer.Value })  //--What to do with matching "rows"
            .ToList()   //--Not necessary, just used so that I can use the foreach below
            .ForEach(item =>
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", item.ID, item.Value);
                });

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

Displayed below:
first: value1
first: value3
second: value1
second: value3

share|improve this answer
    
Yupp. Good example - very clear and informative. I managed to shorten the operation to a just four lines of LINQ with it as a jumping-off-point. –  Andy J Feb 10 '13 at 9:39

Assuming that you still want to keep the intersection as a Dictionary<string, string>:

IEnumerable<Type1> list1;
IEnumerable<Type2> list2;

Dictionary<string, string> intersection = 
    (from item1 in list1
     from item2 in list2
     where item1.common = item2.common
     select new { Key = item1.Id, Value = item2.Value })
         .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => x.Value);
share|improve this answer
    
This is quite a bit less efficient than a Join. You're creating a lot of pairs and then filtering them, as opposed to a join that just is creating all of the right pairs from the start. –  Servy Feb 9 '13 at 6:04
type1.where(i=>type2.where(j=>j.common == i.common).Count > 0);

This should get you a list of only those that match.

share|improve this answer
    
This is quite a bit less efficient than a Join. You're doing a lot of iterations of type2 here through linear searches as opposed to doing set based operations on sets. You also aren't parinig the t1 item with the mates in type2. –  Servy Feb 9 '13 at 6:06

I my be missing something, but would this do:

type1
 .where(t1 => type2.Any(t2 => t1.common == t2.common)
 .ToDictionary(t1 => t1.Id)

Or as Servy suggested

type1
  .Join(type2, a => a.common, b => b.common, (a1,b1) => a1)
  .ToDictionary(t1 => t1.Id)
share|improve this answer
    
This is quite a bit less efficient than a Join. You're doing a lot of iterations of type2 here through linear searches as opposed to doing set based operations on sets. You also aren't parinig the t1 item with the mates in type2. –  Servy Feb 9 '13 at 6:05
    
@Servy you are correct. Efficiency was never a concern. I was trying to convey LINQ concepts to someone who is more familiar with for loops. Why don't you post your answer! –  Richard Schneider Feb 9 '13 at 6:17
    
Why would I post an answer where there are already two answers that solve this problem properly, especially when one is from Eric Lippert. Conveying LINQ concepts, in my mind, means teaching the appropriate method(s) for the task at hand, which this is not. As a general rule, any time you see the pattern you're using of Where with a nested Any, something is wrong. type2 should be a HashSet using Contains if that's at all possible. In any case, this solution doesn't even work. The result needs to be the pair of items, not just one of them. –  Servy Feb 9 '13 at 6:21
    
@Servy Please stop beating me up. I posted before Eric. –  Richard Schneider Feb 9 '13 at 6:26
    
Which is fine, but you told me to post another answer long after he posted his. Your answer is also still wrong and doesn't solve the problem, in addition to starting off in the wrong direction. It should either be edited to correctly answer the question, or just deleted given that there are multiple other correct answers. –  Servy Feb 9 '13 at 6:32

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