Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Following from this answer, I am generating some evenly spaced colors in Python as follows:

>>> import colorsys
>>> num_colors = 22
>>> hsv_tuples = [(x*1.0/num_colors, 0.5, 0.5) for x in range(num_colors)]
>>> rgb_tuples = map(lambda x: colorsys.hsv_to_rgb(*x), hsv_tuples)
>>> rgb_tuples
[(0.5, 0.25, 0.25), (0.5, 0.3181818181818182, 0.25), (0.5, 0.38636363636363635, 0.25), (0.5, 0.45454545454545453, 0.25), (0.4772727272727273, 0.5, 0.25), (0.4090909090909091, 0.5, 0.25), (0.34090909090909094, 0.5, 0.25), (0.2727272727272727, 0.5, 0.25), (0.25, 0.5, 0.2954545454545454), (0.25, 0.5, 0.36363636363636365), (0.25, 0.5, 0.43181818181818177), (0.25, 0.5, 0.5), (0.25, 0.4318181818181819, 0.5), (0.25, 0.36363636363636354, 0.5), (0.25, 0.2954545454545454, 0.5), (0.2727272727272727, 0.25, 0.5), (0.34090909090909083, 0.25, 0.5), (0.40909090909090917, 0.25, 0.5), (0.4772727272727273, 0.25, 0.5), (0.5, 0.25, 0.4545454545454546), (0.5, 0.25, 0.38636363636363646), (0.5, 0.25, 0.3181818181818181)]

Hows does one now convert from these ("coordinate?") RGB tuples back to RGB hex strings, e.g. #FF00AA? Probably a simple question, but not one I've been able to find the answer to.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

1) Multiply the float by 256 and convert to an integer. If it's equal to 256, subtract 1.

EDIT: Since I'm getting a lot of confused comments, the reason why you have to multiply by 256 (subtract 1 if it ends up at 256) is so you get exactly the same number of float values corresponding to each integer output.

2) http://docs.python.org/2/library/string.html?highlight=hexadecimal#format-specification-mini-language

'x' Hex format. Outputs the number in base 16, using lower- case letters for the digits above 9.

Use that, make it upper case and plunk a # before it.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you just want to multiply the float by 255, not 256, then take the int() of that. Think about it. –  martineau Feb 9 '13 at 4:41
    
Assuming int() floors, then if you multiply by 255 only one float value out of the huge, huge number of float values will become a 255 - meaning the rest of the range, 0-254, will have disproportionately more in it. –  Patashu Feb 9 '13 at 6:16
    
If you want proper rounding just use int(round(f*255)). –  martineau Feb 9 '13 at 9:13
    
That's no good either - now 0 and 255 are represented by half as many entries as the other 1-254 entries. Imagine if you wanted to turn 0.0-1.0 to 0-2 and you did it by doing int(round(f*2)) - 0.0 to 0.25 is 0, 0.25 to 0.75 is 1 and 0.75 to 1 is 2 - 1 gets the lion's share of the results!! –  Patashu Feb 9 '13 at 11:15
1  
@martineau Perhaps, but if you don't know why the suggestion is wrong then you'll do it for less granular calculations and get bad bias. –  Patashu Feb 10 '13 at 0:25
show 1 more comment

For each color, floor(color * 256), printed out in hexadecimal (padded to 2 places). e.g.:

In [1]: rgb_tuples = [(0.5, 0.25, 0.25), (0.5, 0.3181818181818182, 0.25), (0.5, 0.38636363636363635, 0.25), (0.5, 0.45454545454545453, 0.25), (0.4772727272727273, 0.5, 0.25), (0.4090909090909091, 0.5, 0.25), (0.34090909090909094, 0.5, 0.25), (0.2727272727272727, 0.5, 0.25), (0.25, 0.5, 0.2954545454545454), (0.25, 0.5, 0.36363636363636365), (0.25, 0.5, 0.43181818181818177), (0.25, 0.5, 0.5), (0.25, 0.4318181818181819, 0.5), (0.25, 0.36363636363636354, 0.5), (0.25, 0.2954545454545454, 0.5), (0.2727272727272727, 0.25, 0.5), (0.34090909090909083, 0.25, 0.5), (0.40909090909090917, 0.25, 0.5), (0.4772727272727273, 0.25, 0.5), (0.5, 0.25, 0.4545454545454546), (0.5, 0.25, 0.38636363636363646), (0.5, 0.25, 0.3181818181818181)]

In [2]: for (r,g,b) in rgb_tuples:
   ...:     print '%02x%02x%02x' % (int(r*256), int(g*256), int(b*256))
   ...:     
804040
805140
806240
807440
share|improve this answer
1  
Does this handle 1.0*256 correctly? –  Patashu Feb 9 '13 at 11:16
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.