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When I try to compile the following code:

    #include <iostream>
    #include <set>
    #include <vector>

    using namespace std;

    template <class T, class S> 
    class Property
    {
    public:
        pair<T,S> p;

        Property(T t, S s) { p = make_pair(t,s);}

    };

    int main()
    {
    set< Property<string, string> > properties;
    Property<string, string> name("name", "Andy");

    properties.insert(name);

    }

I get the compilation error. However, when I replace set by vector and hence use the the push_back function instead of insert function everything works fine. Could anyone explain me what am I doing wrong? Thanks in advice.

share|improve this question
    
You might want to try std::unordered_set if you don't care about the ordering, which you don't seem to here, judging by the error you get, which I've magically deciphered from compiling this in my brain. –  chris Feb 9 '13 at 3:34
    
@chris it'd probably be more work to use std::unordered_set since you have to provide a hash and equality operator. –  Rapptz Feb 9 '13 at 3:44
    
@Rapptz, True, though ordering doesn't seem to me like it would be prominent here. –  chris Feb 9 '13 at 3:46
    
Without defining ordering (operator <(const Property&), the standard std::set has no way of determining identity of an element (which, btw, is done with (!(left < right) && !(right < left)), so make sure your order is consistent). The std::pair<> template defines the most commonly used order comparator already, so unless you have a specific reason not to, you could well easily solve your issue by simply throwing out Property as a formal definition and instead just using typedef std::pair<string,string> Property; I'm guessing, however, you need case-insensitive label comparison. –  WhozCraig Feb 9 '13 at 3:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

std::set stores its values in a sorted binary tree, so it needs to know how to compare the values it holds. By default it uses std::less as a comparison function, which for un-specialized user defined types tries to call operator<. So, the easiest way to tell the set how to compare your objects is to define an operator< for your class:

template <class T, class S> 
class Property
{
public:
    pair<T,S> p;

    Property(T t, S s) { p = make_pair(t,s);}

    bool operator<(const Property<T,S>& rhs) const
    {
        return p < rhs.p;
    }
};

However, there are also other ways of telling std::set how to compare your type. One is to specialize the std::less template for your class:

namespace std {
template<typename T,typename S>
struct less<Property<T, S> >
{
    bool operator()(const Property<T, S>& lhs, const Property<T,S>& rhs) const
    {
        return lhs.p < rhs.p;
    }
};
}

Another is to replace the default comparison type with a function with the correct signature, or a class that has an operator() defined with the correct signature. This is where things start to get ugly.

// Comparison function
template<typename T, typename S>
bool property_less_function(const Property<T,S>& lhs, const Property<T,S>& rhs)
{
    return lhs.p < rhs.p;
}

// Comparison functor
template<typename T, typename S>
struct PropertyLess
{
    bool operator()(const Property<T,S>& lhs, const Property<T,S>& rhs) const
    {
        return lhs.p < rhs.p;
    }
};

int main()
{
    // Set using comparison function. 
    // Have to pass the function pointer in the constructor so it knows
    // which function to call. The syntax could be cleaned up with some
    // typedefs.
    std::set<Property<std::string, std::string>, 
        bool(*)(const Property<std::string, std::string>&, 
                const Property<std::string, std::string>&)> 
            set1(&property_less_function<std::string, std::string>);

    // Set using comparison functor. Don't have to pass a value for the functor
    // because it will be default constructed.
    std::set<Property<std::string, std::string>, PropertyLess<std::string, std::string> > set2;
}

Keep in mind that whatever less-than function you use, that function must define a strict weak ordering for your type.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for clear explanation. –  Andrzej Neugebauer Feb 9 '13 at 21:54

In order to insert something into std::set, you need to have operator< defined.

For example this compiles fine on GCC 4.7.2:

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

template <class T, class S> 
class Property
{
public:
    pair<T,S> p;
    Property(T t, S s) { 
        p = make_pair(t,s);
    }
    bool operator<(const Property& p2) const {
        //Something naive..
        return p < p2.p; 
    }

};

int main()
{
set< Property<string, string> > properties;
Property<string, string> name("name", "Andy");

properties.insert(name);

}

An alternative would be to use std::unordered_set though that would require you to provide a hash for the key and defining operator==.

share|improve this answer
    
your code doesn't compile on my VC :) –  billz Feb 9 '13 at 3:53
    
@billz Granted, I only tried GCC 4.7.2. –  Rapptz Feb 9 '13 at 3:55
    
pair has operator< already, why not just p < p2.p; ? –  billz Feb 9 '13 at 3:56
1  
Your implementation of operator< does not give a strict weak order, so it will cause problems at runtime. Just use pair's operator< to directly compare the stored pairs. –  templatetypedef Feb 9 '13 at 4:00
    
Fixed it, I guess. –  Rapptz Feb 9 '13 at 4:03

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