Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Using the aes_cfb_encrypt and aes_cfb_decrypt functions, I have the following questions.

  1. What is unsigned char *iv (Initialization Vector) in an encryption.
  2. Is it required to preserve the *iv for decryption.
  3. Each time i encrypt a block of data the *iv is modified, What i have to do with this modified *iv.
  4. I am encrypting a large file around 100mb, and passing a random *iv for the very first time, do i have to use the same *iv for the rest of the loop, or i have to use the updated *iv from the last call of encrypt block.

  5. Lastly, I am dealing with a structured file, so do i had to use Sizeof(struct) as the length of the buffer or have to use sizeof(struct)*8 as length of the buffer for encryption or decryption. Please guide..

AES_RETURN aes_cfb_encrypt(const unsigned char *ibuf, unsigned char *obuf, int len, unsigned char *iv, aes_encrypt_ctx cx[1]);

AES_RETURN aes_cfb_decrypt(const unsigned char *ibuf, unsigned char *obuf, int len, unsigned char *iv, aes_encrypt_ctx cx[1]);

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In answering your questions, please note the following:

PT(x) = Plain Text representation of 'x'
CT(x) = Cipher Text representation of 'x'
Bn    = Logical Data Block 'n' in a sequence of multiple blocks.

1. What is an IV?

IV is short notation for Initialization Vector. It is used in symmetric block-encryption algorithms that perform their encryption in what are called chained or feedback modes. In either, the previous block of encrypted data is used as a piece of functional data "goo" to alter the next block of data to be encrypted. Each successive block of data that is encrypted is fed the prior already-encrypted data block as their blob of goo to use. But what about the first block of plaintext? What does it use for its special sauce? Answer: the IV provided to the function. Pictorially, it looks like the following:

CT(B1) = Encrypt(IV + PT(B1))
CT(B2) = Encrypt(CT(B1) + PT(B2))
CT(B3) = Encrypt(CT(B2) + PT(B3))
...
CT(Bn) = Encrypt(CT(Bn-1) + PT(Bn))

Note: '+' in the above denotes the application of the prior cipher block to the next plaintext block. It is not to be thought of as mathematical-addition. Think of it as "combined with".

The size of the IV must be the same as the block size of the symmetric algorithm being used. Both AES-128-CFB and AES-256-CFB use a 128-bit block size (16 bytes). Therefore, your IV should be 16 bytes of random goo for your purposes in this question, and should be generated on the encryption-side using a secure FIPS-compliant random-source algorithm.

2. Is it required to preserve the IV for decryption?

Yes, but not necessarily in the fashion you may first think. The first IV (provided by you) must be retained somehow. Traditionally, it is sent right where you would think it should be; as the first block of encrypted data. This often freaks people out, they think "But if I send the IV with the data, it isn't as secure, is it?" Think about it this way. How many "IV's" are you sending, anyway? Remember, each data block is encrypted using the prior block of encrypted data as its IV. Therefore, you're actually sending an entire stream of IVs, each encrypted block the IV for the next encrypted block, etc. Where the initial IV is in your output ciphertext is a data-representation question, but where it goes is ultimately irrelevant to the question. It must be preserved. It is possible your API does this for you as part of its output stream (it is not uncommon at all, in fact).

3. Each time I encrypt a block of data the *iv is modified, What i have to do with this modified *iv?

I'm not familiar with the API you're using, but it sounds like you're given the IV to use for the next encryption, which makes perfect sense when you consider how feedback or chaining works for block-mode encryption. You should NOT use the same IV repeatedly. Use the one returned last as the next one. Since your API is modifying the IV in place, it appears the only thing you may need to do is preserve the initial IV somewhere else before sending. I would compare the first ciphertext block against your IV. if they are not the same, you probably need to send your IV, then the cipher text chain in your data stream, and have the receiver aware that the first block is the IV of the decryption.

4. I am encrypting a large file around 100mb, and passing a random *iv for the very first time, do i have to use the same *iv for the rest of the loop, or i have to use the updated *iv from the last call of encrypt block.

See (3). Use the updated IV for each successive block.

5. Lastly, I am dealing with a structured file, so do i Sizeof(struct) as the length of the buffer or have to use sizeof(struct)*8 as length of the buffer for encryption or decryption.?

Use the size of your structure in bytes (not bits). The C/C++ sizeof(yourstruct) should compute this for you, but note if you're encrypting each structure as an independent entity (and not the entire file in one mass), each encryption will carry with it a minimum amount of data added to account for (a) the IV used for that structure, and (b) padding the last block out to an even block boundary, assuming you're using PKCS5 padding. The exact size of an encrypted structure, therefore, would be:

IV + ((sizeof(struct) + 15)/16)*16) bytes.

Again, this is if you're independently encrypting, and storing, each structure as a singular encryption, and again, your API may account for some of this for you.

For more information on symmetric AES, see the AES entry on Wiki. For information on the CFB block cipher mode, see the Block Cipher Modes of Operation article on the same site.

I hope this helps. Do some homework and above all, learn exactly how your API works, which is something I cannot, unfortunately, help you with.

share|improve this answer
    
which FIPS-compliant random-source algorithm should be used to generate 128bit hash (MD5 or someother). Point 3 had solved my issue. Thanx a lot. –  Rahul Feb 9 '13 at 14:55
    
@Rahul MD5 is a digest algorithm; not a random generator. Check your crypto API, they should have a random generator. just use that. –  WhozCraig Feb 9 '13 at 16:32
    
ohh sorry, i had checked my crypto api it doesn't contains random number generator. What should i look for. –  Rahul Feb 9 '13 at 17:02
    
Every decent crypto API contains an PRNG of some kind. It is, among other things, what is used in generating large primes for algorithms like RSA. if there isn't one there, there may be one provided elsewhere on your implementation. In a pinch you could use rand(), but it is highly ill-advised. You'd be better off learning the standard libs random generators and using those. look deeper into your API. If that fails, check the C++ standard library options in #include <random>. They will suffice for you unless you're going government. –  WhozCraig Feb 9 '13 at 20:23
    
Thank you sir, I had found it. –  Rahul Feb 10 '13 at 15:09

The initialization vector (IV) in a cryptographic system is a random value that is included as part of the encryption system's initialization to ensure that if the same data is encrypted multiple times, it always comes back looking different. This is a requirement of secure cryptographic systems to ensure that an attacker looking at multiple different encrypted messages cannot easily determine whether any two of those messages are the same. Ideally, the IV should be chosen completely randomly.

You should not need to preserve the IV for decryption. Typically, the IV is sent in plaintext along with the encrypted data. That's not a security concern - it's by design.

The IV is changed on each iteration of encryption because internally the cryptographic system is iteratively applying a block cipher to the data, then using the output of that cipher, combined with some extra data, as the new IV for the next application of the block cipher. This process is then iterated as many times as necessary. I suspect (but am not sure) that the IV is handed back to you so that you can encrypt more data where you left off from before. You should definitely double-check this!

As for whether to use the size of your structure or eight times that - I can't say without seeing more of your code. However, you should probably be providing the total number of bytes to encrypt, so if you're encrypting eight copies of the struct, pass in eight times the sizeof the struct.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Same IV is required for the successful decryption of the encrpted text. If i run my program on a small file of 2 or 3 mb with whole filesize buffer, everything works, but when i try on bigger file the decrypted text is garbage, IV is changed on each iteration. –  Rahul Feb 9 '13 at 6:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.