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Given a string of digits, I would like to have a sequence of tuples mapping the non-zero characters with their position in the string. Example:

IN: "000140201"
OUT: { (3, '1'); (4, '4'); (6, '2'); (8, '1') }

Solution:

let tuples = source
             |> Seq.mapi (fun i -> fun c -> (i, c))
             |> Seq.filter (snd >> (<>) '0')

It seems like (fun i -> fun c -> (i, c)) is a lot more typing than it should be for such a simple and presumably common operation. It's easy to declare the necessary function:

let makeTuple a b = (a, b)
let tuples2 = source
              |> Seq.mapi makeTuple
              |> Seq.filter (snd >> (<>) '0')

But it seems to me that if the library provides the snd function, it should also provide the makeTuple function (and probably with a shorter name), or at least it should be relatively easy to compose. I couldn't find it; am I missing something? I tried to build something with the framework's Tuple.Create, but I couldn't figure out how to get anything other than the single-argument overload.

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5  
Minor improvement Seq.mapi (fun a b -> a,b) –  John Palmer Feb 9 '13 at 6:38
    
@JohnPalmer ah, thanks. I thought I had an error with that syntax earlier, but I suppose the error was caused by something else. –  phoog Feb 9 '13 at 6:52
1  
Also, ||> is the reverse of the operator that you want. –  John Palmer Feb 9 '13 at 6:53
    
As a workaround, replace Seq.mapi with Seq.zip (Seq.initInfinite id) –  bytebuster Feb 9 '13 at 20:20
    
another approach is to use a list comprehension, e.g. [for i=0 to xs.Length-1 do if xs.[i]<>'0' then yield i,xs.[i]] –  Phillip Trelford Feb 9 '13 at 21:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

But it seems to me that if the library provides the snd function, it should also provide the makeTuple function.

F# assumes that you decompose tuples (using fst, snd) much more often than composing them. Functional library design often follows minimal principle. Just provide functions for common use cases, other functions should be easy to define.

I couldn't find it; am I missing something?

No, you aren't. It's the same reason that FSharpx has defined tuple2, tuple3, etc. Here are utility functions straight from Prelude:

/// Creates a pair
let inline tuple2 a b = a,b
/// Creates a 3-tuple
let inline tuple3 a b c = a,b,c
/// Creates a 4-tuple
let inline tuple4 a b c d = a,b,c,d
/// Creates a 5-tuple
let inline tuple5 a b c d e = a,b,c,d,e
/// Creates a 6-tuple
let inline tuple6 a b c d e f = a,b,c,d,e,f

I tried to build something with the framework's Tuple.Create, but I couldn't figure out how to get anything other than the single-argument overload.

F# compiler hides properties of System.Tuple<'T1, 'T2> to enforce pattern matching idiom on tuples. See Extension methods for F# tuples for more details.

That said, point-free style is not always recommended in F#. If you like point-free, you have to do a bit of heavy lifting yourself.

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The @pad's answer is great, just to add my 2 cents: I am using similar operator

let inline (-&-) a b = (a, b)

and it looks very convenient to write let x = a -&- b

Maybe you'll find this operator useful too

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