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I am working on a embedded linux system. I understand what info malloc_stats and /proc/pid/stats provide. I want to know how the info printed by malloc_stats is related to the memory usage info provided by /proc/stats. Background is that I want to instrument each thread in my app to check for memory leaks.Malloc_stats prints useful info but cant be used programatically./proc//task/ has useful info but I am unable to correlate it to the heap memory used by the current thread.

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Have you overlooked the mallinfo() library function? It's where malloc_stats() gets its information from.

To answer the question directly: The data in /proc will reflect the total memory usage of the process, including slack space between memory allocations and free memory, as well as memory that's being used which wasn't allocated through malloc() at all (e.g, the stack, global/static variables, etc). malloc_stats() will break that down into what's actually allocated and what isn't.

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Thank you. My main intention is to get info on per thread basis.I understand best way to get thread wise breakup is to use /proc/pid/task/tid/stat.However based on your reply I understand info on resident set size (rss) does not reflect actual amount of dynamic memory alloced by the thread and total alloted size .Is my understanding correct –  Badri Feb 9 '13 at 8:59
    
Memory is not tracked on a per-thread basis. It belongs to the process, not just to one thread. –  duskwuff Feb 9 '13 at 16:34
    
By definition of a thread, it does not have its own memory space, but shares the memory space with all the threads of the same process. So speaking of memory allocated by a thread is non-sense. It is memory allocated by the whole process (and it is irrelevant which particular thread did the malloc library call, or the mmap syscall called by malloc). –  Basile Starynkevitch Feb 9 '13 at 19:45

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