Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Please look at this code. It just reflects basic concept of what I want to do:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Base
{
public:
    Base() 
    {
        /* Some code I want to reuse */
        Redefined(); 
    }
    virtual ~Base() {}
    void Redefined() { val = 10; }
    int val;
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    Derived() : Base() {}
    ~Derived() {}
    void Redefined() { val = 25; }
};

int main()
{
    Base* check = new Derived();

    cout << check->val << endl;

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

I want the val property of check object to be 25 instead of 10.

As you can see I have two classes. Base class constructor have some complex functionality, which I want Derived class to have in it's constructor as well. How can I change derived function Redefined so that I won't have to rewrite Derived constructor completely (in fact just copy-pasting the whole base class constructor code and replacing one single line of code - updated version of Redefined function)?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

You can't really override a function that way. Normally you could use a virtual functions, but that doesn't work the way you want in the constructor.

A better way is to pass the value you want to the Base constructor:

class Base
{
public:
    Base(int init_val = 10) 
    {
        /* Some code I want to reuse */

        val = init_val;
    }
    virtual ~Base() {}

    int val;
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    Derived() : Base(25) {}
    ~Derived() {}

};

That way any derived class can pass its choice of value to the base class.

share|improve this answer
    
I see. But what if my function Redefined behave alot more complex, for example in my program it's constructing DirectX buffers, thats why I want it to behave differently in Derived class. My initial example is not quite correct in that way - assigning single integer is very simplified version of what I want to achieve. –  GuardianX Feb 9 '13 at 10:44
add comment

Based on comments above:

I would actually think that the correct solution is to have a "interface" type baseclass (that is, a baseclass with pure virtual functions, and the derived class actually implements the correct behaviour), and then let each class deal with constructing its own DirectX buffers. You may find that you need, say, 2-3 different derived classes that construct buffers in different ways, and then derive from those the classes that actually do the real work. I hope that makes sense.

Alternatively, you would be passing enough parameters to the base-class, such that the buffers can be constructed. But I think the first suggestion is a better choice.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.