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Here's my dataframe df

I'm trying:

df=data.frame(rbind(c(1,"*","*"),c("*",3,"*"))
df2=as.data.frame(sapply(df,sub,pattern="*",replacement="NA"))

It doesn't work because of the asterisk but I'm getting mad trying to replace it.

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double backslash is the secret to escaping special characters like the asterisk, have a look here: en.wikibooks.org/wiki/R_Programming/Text_Processing –  Ben Feb 9 '13 at 9:36
    
@Arun great! thanks –  AP13 Feb 9 '13 at 9:38
    
@Ben thanks I take note of this –  AP13 Feb 9 '13 at 9:42
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should put up a full reproducible example, people will be more inclined to help when you make it easy for em. Anywho...

dat <- data.frame(a=c(1,2,'*',3,4), b=c('*',2,3,4,'*'))
> dat
  a b
1 1 *
2 2 2
3 * 3
4 3 4
5 4 *
> as.data.frame(sapply(dat,sub,pattern='\\*',replacement=NA))
     a    b
1    1 <NA>
2    2    2
3 <NA>    3
4    3    4
5    4 <NA>
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thanks for this –  AP13 Feb 9 '13 at 9:47
1  
cheers Arun, don't get nearly enough time to put posts together :/ have twins on the way in a month so that won't really help haha –  nzcoops Feb 9 '13 at 10:18
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If you just have * in (meaning its not like ab*de) your data.frame, then, you can do ths without regex:

df[df == "*"] <- NA
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Both solutions here address an object already in your workplace. If possible (or at least in the future) you can make use of the na.strings argument in read.table. Notice that it is plural "strings", so you should be able to specify more than one character to treat as NA values.

Here's an example: This just writes a file named "readmein.txt" to your current working directory and verifies that it is there.

cat("V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V7\n
2 * * * * * 2\n
1 2 * * * * 1\n", file = "readmein.txt")
list.files(pattern = "readme")
# [1] "readmein.txt"

Here's read.table with the na.strings argument in action.

read.table("readmein.txt", na.strings="*", header = TRUE)
#   V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V7
# 1  2 NA NA NA NA NA  2
# 2  1  2 NA NA NA NA  1

Update: Objects already in your workplace

I see another problem with the other two answers: They both result in character (or rather factor) variables, even when the column should have possibly been numeric.

Here's an example. First, we create an example dataset. For fun, I've added another character to be treated as NA: ".".

temp <- data.frame(
  V1 = c(1:3),
  V2 = c(1, "*", 3),
  V3 = c("a", "*", "c"),
  V4 = c(".", "*", "3"))
temp
#   V1 V2 V3 V4
# 1  1  1  a  .
# 2  2  *  *  *
# 3  3  3  c  3
str(temp)
# 'data.frame':  3 obs. of  4 variables:
#  $ V1: int  1 2 3
#  $ V2: Factor w/ 3 levels "*","1","3": 2 1 3
#  $ V3: Factor w/ 3 levels "*","a","c": 2 1 3
#  $ V4: Factor w/ 3 levels ".","*","3": 1 2 3

Let's make a copy, and then solve this in what I would consider the most obvious "R" way:

temp1 <- temp
temp1[temp1 == "*"|temp1 == "."] <- NA

Looks OK...

temp1
#   V1   V2   V3   V4
# 1  1    1    a <NA>
# 2  2 <NA> <NA> <NA>
# 3  3    3    c    3

... but I presume that V2 and V4 should have been numeric....

str(temp1)
# 'data.frame':  3 obs. of  4 variables:
#  $ V1: int  1 2 3
#  $ V2: Factor w/ 3 levels "*","1","3": 2 NA 3
#  $ V3: Factor w/ 3 levels "*","a","c": 2 NA 3
#  $ V4: Factor w/ 3 levels ".","*","3": 1 NA 3

Here's a workaround:

temp2 <- read.table(text = capture.output(temp), na.strings = c("*", "."))
temp2
#   V1 V2   V3 V4
# 1  1  1    a NA
# 2  2 NA <NA> NA
# 3  3  3    c  3
str(temp2)
# 'data.frame':  3 obs. of  4 variables:
#  $ V1: int  1 2 3
#  $ V2: int  1 NA 3
#  $ V3: Factor w/ 2 levels "a","c": 1 NA 2
#  $ V4: int  NA NA 3

Update 2: (Yet another) alternative

It might be more appropriate to make use of type.convert which is described as a "helper function for read.table" on its help page. I haven't timed it, but my guess is that it would be faster than the workaround I mentioned above, with all the benefits.

data.frame(
  lapply(temp, function(x) type.convert(
    as.character(x), na.strings = c("*", "."))))
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Using the last approach (Update 2), I get NA or <NA> depending on what other entries the row contains, e.g. V1 = c(1, "*", "1") versus V1 = c(1, "*", "a")... Thus, with your temp data.frame I get 2 NA <NA> NA –  PatrickT Jul 24 '13 at 17:02
    
@PatrickT, I'm not sure that I understand your comment. The point I'm trying to make in this answer is exactly that each column should generally be treated individually in determining how to deal with missing values. Can you elaborate on your comment? –  Ananda Mahto Jul 24 '13 at 17:23
    
Sorry I misunderstood. Thanks! –  PatrickT Jul 24 '13 at 18:13
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This could work (It's a pretty flexible) but there's other great solutions already. Arun's solution is my typical approach but created replacer for new R (little experience with the command line) users. I wouldn't recommend replacer for anyone with even a bit of experience.

library(qdap)
replacer(dat, "*", NA)
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