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How can I make LIKE condition case insensitive in SQL, Oracle? upper or lower does not work.

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marked as duplicate by Matteo, Sean Owen, Ben, a_horse_with_no_name, Sindre Sorhus Feb 9 '13 at 13:31

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Possible Duplicate of 1> stackoverflow.com/questions/9931626/… 2> stackoverflow.com/questions/11487105/… –  Pranav Feb 9 '13 at 10:03
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Well upper or lower is the way to do it and it must work, if it does not there is other error in your code. –  jb. Feb 9 '13 at 10:20
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does not work is not a valid Oracle error message. –  a_horse_with_no_name Feb 9 '13 at 10:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Put the LOWER/UPPER condition on both the sides,

WHERE LOWER(column_name) like lower('%value%');

SQLFIDDLE DEMO

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it does not work –  Marshall Black Feb 9 '13 at 10:08
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@MarshallBlack It does work. Check the sqlfiddle demo that I just added. –  Orangecrush Feb 9 '13 at 10:11
    
If you use upper in a column, the database will not use an index if defined in that column, son in a big table this will run very slow. You can define an index with the upper function and leave the query like the example and then the database will use the index. Always review the execution plan for the decision made by the database to use or not your index. Check your database collation and use one with case insensitive, or update your query's to change the collation in this situation if necessary. –  Juan Oct 6 at 1:26
select * from table where upper(column) like '%' || upper('something') || '%';
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OrangeCrush's answer stackoverflow.com/a/14786961/2684342 applies lower to all of the second string, including the %s, whereas you've kept the %s on the outside. Is there a reason for this? –  Tristan Feb 13 at 0:25
    
@Tristan I don't think there would be any difference between the two approaches. –  Kevin Bowersox Feb 13 at 1:36

How did you try upper or lower??

...where lower(col1) like 'your_value%'
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