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I have this table for a cardgame with 2-4 players:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `cardgame` (
  `id` mediumint(8) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `players` tinyint(1) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `p1` mediumint(6) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `p2` mediumint(6) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `p3` mediumint(6) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `p4` mediumint(6) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `p1_state` tinyint(1) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `p2_state` tinyint(1) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `p3_state` tinyint(1) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `p4_state` tinyint(1) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  /* other rows */,
  `game_state` tinyint(1) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM AUTO_INCREMENT=79218 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

I have to check all games, where I am a player. (my user_id is 1981 in the example)

mysql> EXPLAIN SELECT id FROM cardgame 
WHERE ((p1=1981 AND p1_state=1) OR (p2=1981 AND p2_state=1) 
OR (p3=1981 AND p3_state=1) OR (p4=1981 AND p4_state=1)) 
AND game_state < 7;
+----+-------------+----------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table    | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows  | Extra       |
+----+-------------+----------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | cardgame | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 79208 | Using where |
+----+-------------+----------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+-------+-------------+

On which rows can I create indexes? the p1, p1_state, p2.. p3.. p4, p4_state rows needs the index plus the game_state, but isn't it too much?

Or I have to redesign the schema in some way?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Or I have to redesign the schema in some way?

Yes, normalise your schema:

CREATE TABLE game_players (
  game_id  MEDIUMINT NOT NULL,
  position TINYINT   NOT NULL,
  player   MEDIUMINT NOT NULL,
  state    TINYINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL DEFAULT 0,
  PRIMARY KEY (game_id, position),
  UNIQUE (game_id, player), -- if a player can only be in each game once
  INDEX (player, state)
)
SELECT id, 1, p1, p1_state FROM cardgame
  UNION ALL
SELECT id, 2, p2, p2_state FROM cardgame
  UNION ALL
SELECT id, 3, p3, p3_state FROM cardgame
  UNION ALL
SELECT id, 4, p4, p4_state FROM cardgame;

ALTER TABLE cardgame 
  DROP p1, DROP p1_state,
  DROP p2, DROP p2_state,
  DROP p3, DROP p3_state,
  DROP p4, DROP p4_state;

Then your query becomes:

SELECT g.id
FROM   game_players p JOIN cardgame g ON p.game_id = g.id
WHERE  p.player = 1981 AND p.state = 1
   AND g.game_state < 7;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! The JOIN will be faster, than the old query? –  heal Feb 9 '13 at 10:33
    
@heal: Yes, it will. You could even improve performance further by making the index on game_players a covering index (player, state, game_id) and by adding an index on (id, game_state) to the cardgame table: but I suspect you'll find such optimisations are unnecessary (and just add superfluous overhead): remember, premature optimisation is the root of all evil. –  eggyal Feb 9 '13 at 10:35
    
ok @eggyal, thank you! i will change the schema. –  heal Feb 9 '13 at 10:45
1  
@eggyal: I think you need to add an position column in the table, that should accept numbers from 1 to 4. The position of players, in many card games (Poker, Bridge), define the order they are playing. And also a UNIQUE constraint on (game_id, position) –  ypercube Feb 9 '13 at 10:52
    
@ypercube: As ever, you catch me when I fall! ;) –  eggyal Feb 9 '13 at 10:53

A note about data correctness:

@eggyal's redesign in the other answer drops most of the DEFAULTs on your columns. That's a good thing.

One of the big benefits of a NOT NULL is to prevent your program from creating a row that doesn't have all columns properly specified. Having a DEFAULT renders that useless. Let's look at a table similar to your cardgame table:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `cardgame` (
    `id` mediumint(8) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `player_names` varchar(20) NOT NULL,
    `players` tinyint(1) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0'
);

So now you create a row like this:

INSERT INTO cardgame (player_names) VALUES ('Bob and Doug');

You don't specify the id because it's AUTO_INCREMENT, and you specify player_names correctly, but oops, you forgot to specify players. Now you have a value of 0 in your players column, which is bad data. There is never a case where you should be able to add a row to the table without specifying the number of players, right? That DEFAULT '0' removes that restriction, and, even worse, instead puts an invalid number of players into the column. It's never correct to have a game with 0 players, right? But your DEFAULT puts in an invalid number of players in there. Even if you changed the DEFAULT to a valid number like 2, you don't know that it's correct. You must always specify the number of players, right? The DB can't know.

So, never specify a DEFAULT unless it's specifically a column that doesn't have to be specified every time.

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1  
I never tough about this, but you're right. Thank you! –  heal Feb 10 '13 at 13:11

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