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I am new to developing in android. In my android app I'm using HashMap, but I'm getting a warning:

**"Use new SparseArray<String>(...) instead for better performance"**

What does this mean, and how can I use SparseArray<String> instead?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 78 down vote accepted

Use new SparseArray<String>(...) instead for better performance

You are getting this warning because of reason described here.

SparseArrays map integers to Objects. Unlike a normal array of Objects, there can be gaps in the indices. It is intended to be more efficient than using a HashMap to map Integers to Objects.

Now

how i use SparseArray ?

You can do it by below ways:

  1. HashMap way:

    Map<Integer, Bitmap> _bitmapCache = new HashMap<Integer, Bitmap>();
    private void fillBitmapCache() {
         _bitmapCache.put(R.drawable.icon, BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.icon));
         _bitmapCache.put(R.drawable.abstrakt, BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.abstrakt));
         _bitmapCache.put(R.drawable.wallpaper, BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.wallpaper));
         _bitmapCache.put(R.drawable.scissors, BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), 
     }
    
    Bitmap bm = _bitmapCache.get(R.drawable.icon);
    
  2. SparseArray way:

    SparseArray<Bitmap> _bitmapCache = new SparseArray<Bitmap>();
    private void fillBitmapCache() {
         _bitmapCache.put(R.drawable.icon, BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.icon));
         _bitmapCache.put(R.drawable.abstrakt, BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.abstrakt));
         _bitmapCache.put(R.drawable.wallpaper, BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.wallpaper));
         _bitmapCache.put(R.drawable.scissors, BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), 
     }
    
    Bitmap bm = _bitmapCache.get(R.drawable.icon);
    

Hope it Will Help.

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SparseArray is used when you are using an Integer as a key.

When using the SparseArray, the key will stay as a primitive variable at all items unlike when you use the HashMap where it is required to have a Object as a key which will cause the int to become an Integer object just for a short time while getting the object in the map.

By using the SparseArray you will save the Garbage Collector some work.

So use just like a Map<Integer,String>.

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4  
+1, avoids the autoboxing (and associated objects+GC) that happens with HashMap. @cyril-mottier wrote about it here: speakerdeck.com/cyrilmottier/… –  orip Jun 26 '13 at 13:29

It's a hint that there is a better data structure for your code.

That hint is from Lint. You usually get it when you have a HashMap of integers to something else.

Its biggest advantage is to treat the integer key as a primitive. In other words, it won't covert to an Integer (the Java object) to use it as a key.

This is a big deal when using large maps. HashMap will result in the creation of many, many Integer objects in that case.

See a few more pieces of information here.

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Use new SparseArray instead of HashMap for better performance.

Issue: Looks for opportunities to replace HashMaps with the more efficient SparseArray

SparseArray<String> s_array = new SparseArray<String>();

private void callthis() {
    s_array.put(1,"value");
    s_array.put(2,"value");
    s_array.put(3,"value");
}

using the SparseArray helps you to save the Garbage Collector some work.

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