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For the following code, how do I specify which phone number type (HomePhone or WorkPhone) the function storePhone is storing the Int as?

type HomePhone = Int
type WorkPhone = Int

data Phone = HomePhone
           | WorkPhone

storePhone :: int -> Phone 
storePhone num = num

main :: IO ()
main = print $ storePhone 12345678

This question was a simplified version of the question I have for a side project I'm doing. I have a module that parses a file to the relevant data type (aka like in sample the Phone type). All the data is Double but have different semantic meaning. In another module, I have methods that use the data. Each method takes different permutations of data types(aka HomePhone, WorkPhone) as arguments. I could have made HomePhone and WorkPhone data type or even newtype, but it would have made the methods that used the data look messy with lots of pattern matching and stuff. So was just wondering if I could simplify the data type(aka Phone) so that it was a bit more elegant and still type safe. Cheers! I guess I should do the following?

type HomePhone = Int
type WorkPhone = Int

data Phone = HomePhone HomePhone 
           | WorkPhone WorkPhone 
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2  
Does it even compile? Compiler can give you a lot of helpful information in errors and warnings. –  Yuras Feb 9 '13 at 12:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In its current form the Phone type isn't capable of storing any phone numbers. It has two constructors that both take zero arguments and thus can't store anything. The fact that the constructors' names are equal to the type names you defined earlier doesn't mean anything.

You probably intended something like this:

type PhoneNumber = String -- Storing phone numbers as ints is a bad idea

data PhoneType = HomePhone
               | WorkPhone
                 deriving Show

data Phone = Phone PhoneType PhoneNumber
             deriving Show

storePhone :: PhoneNumber -> PhoneType -> Phone
storePhone number typ = Phone typ number

main :: IO ()
main = print $ storePhone "12345678" HomePhone
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I think sepp2k answered your question very well, but I will try to explain, why I think you had the problem in the first place. There is a difference between types and values - and between type constructors and value constructors.

Phone = Phone

In this example, the left hand side is a type, and the right hand side is a value. Notice that a type and a value can both have the same name. The compiler will figure out, what you mean. Basically, in type declarations and data declarations, you mean the type, and in function implementations, you mean the value.

Phone = NoPhone
      | Phone Int

In this example, NoPhone is a value, and the right hand side Phone is a value constructor, since it takes a value of type Int to make a value. The left hand side is still a type.

Container a = NotEmpty a
            | Empty

In this example, Container is a type constructor, since you can give it a type such a Int to get a type - which in this case would be the type Container Int. Empty is a value, and NotEmpty is a value constructor, that takes a value of whatever type you happen to pick for a - let's call that type T, to yield a value of type Container T.

In your example, you mix the concepts of types and values.

type HomePhone = Int
type WorkPhone = Int

This says that HomePhone and WorkPhone are just different names for the type Int

data Phone = HomePhone
           | WorkPhone

This says that anything of type Phone has either the value HomePhone or the value WorkPhone. Importantly, these values are not the same as the type synonyms with the same names, which you declared earlier.

storePhone :: int -> Phone

This says that storePhone takes a value of type Int and returns a value of type Phone.

storePhone num = num

This is a problem. In this line, num is a value of type Int, but you return num, and you just said in the type declaration that you would return a value of type Phone, i.e. either the value HomePhone or the value WorkPhone. If you wanted to be silly, but conform to your type declaration, you could do

storePhone num = if num > 0 then HomePhone else WorkPhone -- silly, but compiles :)
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