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I'm writing public functions in one project for some database actions meant to be called from other projects. Straight to code, I can go for following approaches:

public int GetCount(Apple apple, Orange orange)
{
    try 
    { 
       // query; 

       return 1000;
    } 
    catch 
    { 
        // log it
        return -1; 
    }
}

or

public int? GetCount(Apple apple, Orange orange)
{
    try 
    { 
       // query; 

       return 1000;
    } 
    catch 
    { 
        // log it
        return null; 
    }
}

or

public bool GetCount(Apple apple, Orange orange, out int count)
{
    count = -1;
    try 
    { 
       // query; 

       count = 1000;
       return true;
    } 
    catch 
    { 
        // log it
        return false; 
    }
}

I currently do the "null" way for other business objects, like:

public Apple GetApple(Orange orange)
{
    try 
    { 
       // query; 

       return apple;
    } 
    catch 
    { 
        // log it
        return null; 
    }
}

And the caller checks if the value returned is null and accordingly pops an error message. So I'm inclined to use int? as return type for value types as well. But I would love to know what is an acceptable design or encouraged practice for these things..

Edit: If I put try catch around the caller, wouldn't that leave my code base littered with try catch everywhere? Isn't it easier to catch exception from the callee so that all the functions that call it need not care? What is wrong if callee catches the error and lets the caller know some error had happened?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, It's quite subjective and you won't get standardized answers, but Framework Design Guidelines book, which is good resource for developing conventions, states "Do not swallow error by catching non-specific exceptions, such as Exception or SystemException". If you swallow it and return some magic value including null, you won't be able to recognize the underlying reasons for system failure.

Personally, I would go with

public int GetCount(Apple apple, Orange orange)
{
    try 
    { 
       return // query; 
    } 
    catch 
    { 
        // log it
        throw;
    }
}

Another personal point - I've spend too much time diagnosing and debugging in order to understand why system is not working and then, in the end, just to find out that exception was silently logged and swallowed. Now I'm felling so much pain, when I encounter code like catch(Exception e) { return null; }.

share|improve this answer
    
But doesnt that mean one have to write try catch again from the caller side to know of the error? – nawfal Feb 9 '13 at 12:20
    
First, one big point - why are you trying to write catch block, if ou can't handle the exception? You know, that Java team named it wrong - it's not catch, it's handle (not trying to be insulting). Catching the exception and not throwing it back is almost always useless – Ilya Ivanov Feb 9 '13 at 12:25
    
So are you not saying there needs to be no try catch at all at the callee (the GetCount method)? But you have used one in your answer. – nawfal Feb 9 '13 at 12:43
    
@IlyaIvanov: Actually, there are many cases where finding out that an exception occurred is useful; what's missing in Java, C#, and VB.net, and can only accurately be simulated in the latter, is a means by which code in a finally block can find out what exception (if any) is pending without pretending to handle it. – supercat Feb 11 '13 at 14:25

It is bad practice to swallow exceptions.

If the exception cannot be handled by the method, bubble it up to the caller:

public int GetCount(Apple apple, Orange orange)
{
    try 
    { 
       // query; 

       return 1000;
    } 
    catch 
    { 
        // log it
        throw;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But doesnt that mean one have to write try catch again from the caller side to know of the error? – nawfal Feb 9 '13 at 12:20
    
Yes. That catch is where the error message is shown. – dtb Feb 9 '13 at 12:25
    
hmm wouldnt that leave my code base littered with try catch everywhere. I had thought its easier to catch exception from the callee so that all the functions that call it doesnt need to care. What is wrong if callee catches it and lets the caller know some error had happened? – nawfal Feb 9 '13 at 12:31
    
and lets the caller know some error had happened yes, and this is done via exceptions. What's the point of the callee catching it? – Ilya Ivanov Feb 9 '13 at 12:34
    
Checking some return value litters the code as well. The way to let the caller know some error had happened is to throw an exception. As Ilya Ivanov writes, swallowing the exception can lead to very difficult to debug bugs. – dtb Feb 9 '13 at 12:34

In situations where int provides a value which is clearly not otherwise legitimate for the domain, and where there's no need for default<int> to be anything other than zero, I don't see any advantage to Nullable<T>. The Nullable<int> types are annoying for callers to work with, since it's necessary to test for null and then extract the value to some other storage location before use. If one makes the mistake of doing something like:

if (res.HasValue)
  for (i=0; i<res.Value; i++)
    ....

then loop overhead will likely be more than double what it would have been with:

if (res.HasValue)
{
  int resValue = res.Value;
  for (i=0; i<resValue; i++)
    ....
}

but requiring the caller to create an extra variable to avoid an absurd level of loop overhead seems burdensome.

share|improve this answer

I would use the int? as well. It is important to note that, this helps you in using all the numbers - and not reserving a particular number to identify a status.

This is what C and C++ lack, which use integers to convey status, inadvertently reserving a number for special use.

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