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I am trying to install the JDK on Ubuntu and Linux, but I am unable to install it.

What are the steps to install it on Ubuntu?

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Which JDK version? Java6 or 7? 32 or 64 bit version? –  Joachim Isaksson Feb 9 '13 at 12:59
    

8 Answers 8

up vote 170 down vote accepted

Referring to Ask Ubuntu question How to set JAVA_HOME for OpenJDK?,

How to install "Open JDK" (Java developement kit) in Ubuntu (Linux)?

  1. Open Applicaction -> Accessories -> Terminal

  2. Type commandline as below...

    sudo apt-get install openjdk-7-jdk
    
  3. Type commandline as below...

    apt-cache search jdk
    

    (Note: openjdk-6-jdk is symbolically used here. You can choose the JDK version as per your requirement.)

  4. For "JAVA_HOME" (Environment Variable) type command as shown below, in "Terminal" using your installation path...

    export JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/java-7-openjdk
    

    (Note: "/usr/lib/jvm/java-6-openjdk" is symbolically used here just for demostration. You should use your path as per your installation.)

  5. For "PATH" (Environment Variable) type command as shown below, in "Terminal" using your installation path...

    export PATH=$PATH:/usr/lib/jvm/java-7-openjdk/bin
    

    (Note: "/usr/lib/jvm/java-6-openjdk" is symbolically used here just for demostration. You should use your path as per your installation.)

  6. Check for "open jdk" installation, just type command in "Terminal" as shown below

    javac
    
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9  
I copied your "export PATH=" ... command and screwed up my box. Please correct it to: "export PATH=$PATH:/usr/lib/jvm/java-6-openjdk/bin" –  IEnumerator Jun 27 '13 at 23:08
13  
I'd replace export PATH=$PATH:/usr/lib/jvm/java-6-openjdk/bin with export PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_HOME/bin, which is more DRY –  Nico Dec 18 '13 at 20:28
2  
just replace everywhere java-6-openjdk to java-7-openjdk if you want to install java7 –  E6aTb_E6aTb May 30 at 12:57
    
Even after doing Nico's suggestions, my PATH variable was still all screwed, still unable to use basic terminal commands. The fix was to run: export PATH=/usr/bin:/bin at the command prompt. Then all was fine. –  AndyUK Jul 21 at 7:10

Wiki from Ubuntu website:

For Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, the sun-java6 packages have been dropped from the Multiverse section of the Ubuntu archive. It is recommended that you use openjdk-6 instead.

If you can not switch from the proprietary Sun JDK/JRE to OpenJDK, you can install sun-java6 packages from the Canonical Partner Repository. You can configure your system to use this repository via command-line:

 sudo add-apt-repository "deb http://archive.canonical.com/ lucid partner"
 sudo apt-get update   
 sudo apt-get install sun-java6-jre sun-java6-plugin
 sudo update-alternatives --config java

For Ubuntu 10.10, the sun-java6 packages have been dropped from the Multiverse section of the Ubuntu archive. It is recommended that you use openjdk-6 instead.

If you can not switch from the proprietary Sun JDK/JRE to OpenJDK, you can install sun-java6 packages from the Canonical Partner Repository. You can configure your system to use this repository via command-line:

 sudo add-apt-repository "deb http://archive.canonical.com/ maverick partner"
 sudo apt-get update   
 sudo apt-get install sun-java6-jre sun-java6-plugin
 sudo update-alternatives --config java
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In case you have already downloaded the ZIP file follow these steps.

Run the following command to unzip your file.

tar -xvf ~/Downloads/jdk-7u3-linux-i586.tar.gz
sudo mkdir -p /usr/lib/jvm/jdk1.7.0
sudo mv jdk1.7.0_03/* /usr/lib/jvm/jdk1.7.0/
sudo update-alternatives --install "/usr/bin/java" "java" "/usr/lib/jvm/jdk1.7.0/bin/java" 1
sudo update-alternatives --install "/usr/bin/javac" "javac" "/usr/lib/jvm/jdk1.7.0/bin/javac" 1
sudo update-alternatives --install "/usr/bin/javaws" "javaws" "/usr/lib/jvm/jdk1.7.0/bin/javaws" 1

After installation is complete, set environment variables as follows.

Edit the system path in file /etc/profile:

sudo gedit /etc/profile

Add the following lines at the end.

JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/jdk1.7.0
PATH=$PATH:$HOME/bin:$JAVA_HOME/bin
export JAVA_HOME
export JRE_HOME
export PATH

Source: http://javaandme.com/

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Thanks! I was looking for the method using update-alternatives –  GermanK Sep 27 at 14:28
    
This worked! Thank you. I'd recommend clicking the link and following the instructions as it's much clearer there. –  john Oct 25 at 4:36

sun-java6-jdk is a virtual package provided by oracle-java8-installer or oracle-java7-installer or oracle-java7-installer.

sudo apt-get install oracle-java8-installer  

will give you sun-java6-jdk.

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Have a look at OpenJDK. It is the standard JVM implementation on Linux.

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sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/java
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install oracle-java7-installer
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For more information: webupd8.org/2012/01/… –  infostacker Feb 3 at 16:39
1  
This is clean and easy. –  Sam Rad May 21 at 0:28
2  
This is what I used. If you want java6 : sudo apt-get install oracle-java6-installer . if you want java8 : sudo apt-get install oracle-java8-installer . If you have multiple java installed on your system, you can select with : sudo update-alternatives --config java –  Guagua Jun 13 at 22:27

I recommend JavaPackage:

https://wiki.debian.org/JavaPackage

It's very simple, you just need to follow the instructions to create a .deb package from the oracle tar.gz file.

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You can install Oracle's JDK 1.7 fairly easily too; as an example this is how to install JDK 1.7.0_13;

As root, do;

> cd /usr/local
> tar xzf <the file you just downloaded>

As your normal user, add or change these two lines in your ~/.profile to point to the installation;

export JAVA_HOME=/usr/local/jdk1.7.0_13
export PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_HOME/bin

If it's an update, you may also want to remove the old java installation directory in /usr/local.

Log out and in again (or do . ~/.profile), and everything should just work.

The downside with Oracle's JDK is that it won't update with the rest of your system like OpenJDK will, so I'd mostly consider it if you're running programs that require it.

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1  
do i need to give the path to the downloaded folder in tar xzf command –  Illegal Argument Nov 16 '13 at 4:29
1  
@Subash you need the downloaded file to be in th /usr/local directory before running the tar xzf command. To get that, cd to the path where your downloaded file is and run: sudo mv <nameOfYourFile.tar.gz> /usr/local –  Jorge Antonio Díaz-Benito Nov 18 '13 at 9:29

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