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I've been working on the input from file and think I have the logic right, but my nodes aren't linking properly. I'm able to set the root correctly and the program is able to walk through the string and load the nodes properly, just not link them. Can anyone help me sort through my logic and figure out the problem?

The input string is (A (B (D G) E) (C () F)).

    struct node
    {
     string data;
     node* left;
     node* right;
    };

    void tree::build_tree(string &input, int i, node *n)
    {
     if(i > input.length())
          return *n = NULL;

     if(input[i] == '(')
     {
      string data; string temp;
      int prev_i = i;

     //get_data retrieves the identifier
     data = get_data(input, temp, i+1);

     //get_data_num retrieves the new position in the string
     i = get_data_num(input, temp, i+1);

     if(input[prev_i] == '('&& input[i] == ')')
     {
      i += 1;
      *n = NULL;
     }
     else
     {
      // Allocate a new node and assign the data and 
      // set the pointer to the branches to null
      *n = new node;
     (*n)->data = data;
     (*n)->left = NULL;
     (*n)->right = NULL;

     if(input[i] == ' ')
     {i += 1; }

     //Pass the address of the nodes
     build_tree(input, i, &(*n)->left);
     build_tree(input, i, &(*n)->right);
     }

   }

   else if(isalnum(input[i]) || input[i] == '_' || input[i] == '-')
   {
     string data; string temp;
     int prev_i = i;

     data = get_data(input, temp, i);
     i = get_data_num(input, temp, i);

     if(input[prev_i] == '('&& input[i] == ')')
     {
      i += 1;
      *n = NULL;
     }
     else
     {
      *n = new node;
      (*n)->data = data;
      (*n)->left = NULL;
      (*n)->right = NULL;

      if(input[i] == ' ')
      { i += 1; }

     build_tree(input, i, &((*n)->left));
     build_tree(input, i, &((*n)->right));
   }
  }

   else if(input[i] == ' ')
   {
    i += 1;
   }

    else if(input[i] == ')')
    {
     i += 1;
     *n = NULL;
    }

    else
    {
     cout << "The input tree is not in the correct format!" << endl;
    }
    }
share|improve this question
    
The parameter i should be a reference. Otherwise, two consecutive recursive calls (parsing the child nodes left and right) will read at the same position! Just try int &i in the parameter list, with no other changes, and report the results. – leemes Feb 9 '13 at 14:11
    
@leemes I tried that and I'm still getting the same results. – user2057191 Feb 9 '13 at 14:48
    
Please post your node structure. It may help in understanding the problem. – Glenn Feb 9 '13 at 15:45
    
@Glenn Ok, I've posted that. – user2057191 Feb 9 '13 at 15:55
    
@user2057191 Thank you. That was very helpful. I supplied an answer below as it was to not to fit in a comment. – Glenn Feb 9 '13 at 20:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I believe the issue is that you are not setting the value of the left and right pointers. You are passing the values of the pointers. You need to pass a pointer to the pointers (left and right), to set the value in the structure. The other alternative is to use references instead of pointers.

Here are the modifications I came up with for the code you supplied:

  • Changed the call to build_tree for the node argument be a pointer to a pointer.
  • Changed assignments of values accordingly.
  • Changed call to build_tree to pass the address of left and right (to get a pointer to a pointer).
  • Remove the assignment/conditions to set the root_node. So when you call the build_tree you need to pass in the address of root. This will set the node just like all of the nodes which follow, so it does not need to be a special case.
  • Added assignment of NULL for left and right in case there is not a branch (may not need to do this, but I feel it is good practice to make sure all items have some initial values).
void tree::build_tree(string &input, int i, node **n)
{

  if(input[i] == '(')
  {
    string data; string temp;

    //get_data retrieves the identifier
    data = get_data(input, temp, i+1);

    //get_data_num retrieves the new position in the string
    i = get_data_num(input, temp, i+1);

    // Allocate a new node and assign the data and 
    // set the pointer to the branches to null
    *n = new node;
    (*n)->data = data;
    (*n)->left = NULL;
    (*n)->right = NULL;

    if(input[i] == ' ')
    { i += 1; }

    // Pass the address of the nodes 
    build_tree(input, i, &(*n)->left);
    build_tree(input, i, &(*n)->right);
  }

  else if(isalnum(input[i]) || input[i] == '_' || input[i] == '-')
  {
    string data; string temp;
    data = get_data(input, temp, i);
    i = get_data_num(input, temp, i);

    *n = new node;
    (*n)->data = data;
    (*n)->left = NULL;
    (*n)->right = NULL;

    if(input[i+1] == ' ')
    { i += 1; }

    build_tree(input, i, &((*n)->left));
    build_tree(input, i, &((*n)->right));
  }

  else if(input[i] == ' ')
  {
    i += 1;
  }

  else if(input[i] == ')')
  {
    *n = NULL;
  }

  else
  {
   cout << "The input tree is not in the correct format!" << endl;
  }
}

Then for the initial call,

build_tree(testString,0,&root);

Since the get_data and get_data_num were not supplied, I was not able to test the changes which were made.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much! This solved my problem of getting the nodes to connect. I just had to make some minor tweaks to fit my updated code. – user2057191 Feb 9 '13 at 21:15
    
Your very welcome. Glad I could help. – Glenn Feb 9 '13 at 22:18
    
I just tested it again and only left nodes are setting. Any ideas? – user2057191 Feb 9 '13 at 22:39
    
I'll have to take a look at it later and get back with you. Hopefully I will have an answer later in the day. Thanks. – Glenn Feb 10 '13 at 7:35
    
I suspect there is something incorrect in the parsing and assignments that is is making left nodes, and not right. Another issue is that after ( a data value is expected. However in your example, you have a () which would indicate there is not a data value. I would like a bit more explanation about how the tree looks. For example (A (B (D G E)(C () F ), does that mean there is not a data value at the top node, or is the input not well formed? I may have something which works, but I could use the additional information. – Glenn Feb 11 '13 at 6:20

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