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I'm just starting out with Javascript and HTML5 so it's entirely likely that I'm making some really dumb mistake. In fact I hope that's all it is and that this is an easy fix.

Here is the output I'm getting:

Weird, wrong image (Try it yourself!)

What I want to happen is just to draw a blue rectangle over the gray rectangle, where both colors are their own thing. I'm honestly confused as to why this blending is the default (using Chrome on my machine).

Here is the minimal working example (again, for my machine):

(html)

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Simple Canvas Game</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <script src="js/game.js"></script>
    </body>
</html>

(javascript, this is the game.js)

//set up the canvas
var canvas = document.createElement("canvas");
var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
canvas.width = 512;
canvas.height = 480;
document.body.appendChild(canvas);

// Draw everything
var render = function () {
    ctx.clearRect(50, 50, 100, 100);

    ctx.fillStyle = "rgb(240, 240, 240)";
    ctx.fillRect(0, 0, 100, 100);

    ctx.strokeStyle="rgb(0, 0, 255)";
    ctx.strokeRect(20,20,150,100);
}

setInterval(render, 10);
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is not blending, it's just that the stroke is 1 pixel wide, and the coordinates in canvas are those of squares, while lines go between squares. Your lines go between pixels and are anti-aliased. If you want your strokes to align with pixels, you need to use coordinates like (99.5,99.5), not (100,100). Hard to describe, but there is plenty of documentation available.

To make long story short, you have to translate the whole drawing code by 0.5,0.5. Try something like:

ctx.save();
ctx.translate(0.5,0.5);

ctx.clearRect(50, 50, 100, 100);

ctx.fillStyle = "rgb(240, 240, 240)";
ctx.fillRect(0, 0, 100, 100);

ctx.strokeStyle="rgb(0, 0, 255)";
ctx.strokeRect(20,20,150,100);
ctx.restore(); 
share|improve this answer
    
That makes a ton of sense (I have seen antialiasing before, just not JS) and fixes the problem, but it's weird that it would have that kind of behavior for integer coordinates. Ah, differing design decisions. –  Richard Rast Feb 9 '13 at 15:13

Check out the globalCompositeOperation option. Seems like you had set it to "lighter", while you want the default "source-over".

share|improve this answer
    
Sounds promising from the description, but it doesn't work. I added the line ' ctx.globalCompositeOperation = "source-over"; ' in the render code as well as where I created the ctx variable, but the problem image remains the same. –  Richard Rast Feb 9 '13 at 15:07
    
@Richard: See fdregers answer, that's it. Your strokes are distributed over 2 pixels which gives them an alpha. –  Bergi Feb 9 '13 at 15:13

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