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Suppose I have:

public class OuterClass() {

  public class InnerClass {
    public void someMethod(int x) {
      someMethod(x);
    }
  }

  public void someMethod(int x) {
    System.out.println(x);
  }
}

How do I resolve the ambiguity between the someMethod() of the outer class and the someMethod() of the inner class?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can refer to the outer with OuterClass.this, or call the method with OuterClass.this.method().

However, as a point of design, sharing the name is confusing, to say the least. It might be reasonable if the inner class represented an extension or, say, a concrete implementation of an abstract method, but that would be clearer by calling super.method. Calling a super method directly, (as it looks like you're intending to do?), is confusing.

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+1 for "you don't really need to name it this way, do you?" –  matt b Sep 25 '09 at 20:03

Scope it to the outer class with OuterClass.this.someMethod():

public class OuterClass {

  public class InnerClass {

    public void someMethod(int x) {
      OuterClass.this.someMethod(x);
    }
  }

  public void someMethod(int x) {
    System.out.println(x);
  }
}
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Aw... Steve B. posted the same answer just before me. I will leave mine here for the example code. –  SingleShot Sep 25 '09 at 18:47

Renaming ambiguity is a good practice. Especially if you apply it in the upward and backward architecture.

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1  
This won't work if the class is implementing an interface. –  Mel Nicholson Dec 7 '12 at 19:16

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