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I want to detect and style a special letter . for example something like this :

body["p"] / body["2"]

how can I do this? thanks

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2  
You cannot with pure CSS. –  Bergi Feb 9 '13 at 15:36
    
what about js ? –  user1599537 Feb 9 '13 at 15:37

2 Answers 2

You cannot with CSS. The only non-element (css-created) pseudo-elements are ::first-line and ::first-letter.

However, you could search with JS through the DOM and create tags around the letters to be highlighted. Check highlight words in html using regex & javascript - almost there for how to do that.

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thanks, what is the problem with this tiny code? ' var a=getElementById("b") if a!=NaN {style.color="blue"}' –  user1599537 Feb 9 '13 at 15:54
    
@user1599537 the problem with that code is that it 1) doesn't work and 2) is riddled with errors. –  Mathletics Feb 9 '13 at 15:56
    
could you please fix this code? :P –  user1599537 Feb 9 '13 at 15:59
    
@user1599537: What is it supposed to do? Your current snippet looks up an element with the id "b", compares it against NaN (which it oviously is not equal to) and then sets a property on a variable named style. –  Bergi Feb 9 '13 at 16:07
    
for example detect numbers and style it.. –  user1599537 Feb 9 '13 at 16:09

You could do this on a node-by-node basis with a fairly simple replace, but it wouldn't scale very well.

Given the markup:

<p>Peter Rabbit ate all of Potter's pickling cukes.</p>

If you wanted to add a style to all of the letters p in this text, you could select the paragraph node and add spans around any p (assuming a single paragraph):

var graf = document.getElementsByTagName('p')[0];
graf.innerHTML = graf.innerText.replace(/(p)/gi,'<span class="fancy">$1</span>');

That said, this would only work on plain text nodes; if you had, for example, a span tag already in the p tag, it'd get mucked up by the replace.

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