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Row is user-inputted.

cout << "Input the number of rows: ";
cin >> row;
column=row;

int triangle[row][column];

for (i=0;i<=row;i++){
    for (j=0;j<=column;j++){
           triangle[i][j]=0;
    }
}

for (i=0;i<=row;i++){
    for (j=0;j<=i;j++){
           if (j==0 || j==i){
           triangle[i][j]=1;
           } else {
           triangle[i][j]=triangle[i-1][j]+triangle[i-1][j-1];
           }
    }
}

cout << "Pascals triangle with " << row << " rows.";

for (i=0;i<=row;i++){
    for (j=0;j<=i;j++){
        cout << triangle[i][j] << "\t";
    }
    cout << endl;
}

It does give out proper results when the row is seven, but it somehow crashes when the inputted row is greater than 8.

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4  
Please show the rest of the code. In particular the declaration of triangle. –  David Heffernan Feb 9 '13 at 15:49
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closed as too localized by Lightness Races in Orbit, Shai, Ajay, X.L.Ant, SztupY Feb 10 '13 at 11:00

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Most likely triangle is not declared with enough memory for the indices you use. If row==column==8 then you need to declare it like this:

double triangle[9][9];

Because C++ uses zero-based indices this allows for indices in the range 0 to 8 inclusive. Most likely your declaration is like this:

double triangle[8][8];
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Wew. Thanks. I forgot about that one. Sorry, newbie here. –  user2027369 Feb 9 '13 at 15:56
    
If the answer is correct you should accept it –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Dec 19 '13 at 0:27
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This is because of <= in your for loop conditions: recall that array indexes in C++ are zero-based, so if the size is 8, the last index is 7, not 8.

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1  
This is pure conjecture based on the fact that the OP hasn't shown the code for allocating the array yet. Please add a "probably" or something. –  Mr Lister Feb 9 '13 at 15:53
    
dasblinkenlight was right. I did go out-of-bounds. Just a common programming error I didn't notice. –  user2027369 Feb 9 '13 at 15:58
    
@MrLister Once the probability of the conjecture goes beyond 85%, you might as well drop "probably" from the sentence: certain errors have only so many possible causes :) –  dasblinkenlight Feb 9 '13 at 16:03
1  
I agree. Given the code in the original version of the question, there was only one plausible explanation. –  David Heffernan Feb 9 '13 at 16:04
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