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Suppose I have a language consisting of just balanced parentheses, i.e., {ε, ( ), ( ( ) ), ( ) ( ), ( ( ( ) ) ), ( ( ) ( ) ), ... } and I'm asked to write a recursive definition for it. Could somebody give me an example of what that could look like? - I'm a bit new to this type of computer science theory.

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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A kind of recursive definition is grammar. To generate language of balanced parentheses :

S --> (S) | SS | ^

this is recursive because S appears in RHS of production rules.

production rules: LHS --> RHS

EDIT

Why (s) not S ?

because to add () pairs recursively and more then one time.

S --> (S) --->  ((S))   

in second step inner S is replaced by (S).

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Could you please explain this a bit more?: why (S) and not S? Also, why stop at SS - why not SSSS as well? –  John Roberts Feb 9 '13 at 16:54
    
@JohnRoberts to get SSSS you apply the rule twice: S->SS->SSSS. –  icepack Feb 9 '13 at 17:02
    
Ok, thanks. And ^ terminates the recursion? –  John Roberts Feb 9 '13 at 17:04
    
@JohnRoberts ^ is used to convert sentential form into sentence. S--^ can you use S --> (S) ---> ((S)) --^ --> (()) –  sumit Feb 11 '13 at 7:35
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TEXT ::= BRACES | BRACKETS | LIST;
BRACES ::= "{" ( TEXT | /* nothing */ ) "}";
BRACKETS ::= "(" ( TEXT | /* nothing */ ) ")";
LIST ::= ( BRACES | BRACKETS ) | ( BRACES | BRACKETS ) "," LIST;
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There are no brackets in the language. –  John Roberts Feb 9 '13 at 16:53
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