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Altering a JSON variable is failing for following snippet:

var data = {status: ''};

rosconnection.setOnOpen(function (e) {
        data.status = 'Succeeded';
        alert('success');
});

rosconnection.setOnError(function (e) {
        data.status = 'Failed';
        alert('fail');
});

data stays empty, but the alert gets called within rosconnection.setOnOpen. The error is hard to replicate hence its used on a ros connection, but i am 100% certain that it enters atleast one of the functions with success.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You didn't show us how you know the status didn't change so...

My bet is: there is no way you saw the alert without the data being changed so your code probably looks something like this:

var data = {status: ''};

rosconnection.setOnOpen(function (e) {
        data.status = 'Succeeded';
        alert('success');
});

rosconnection.setOnError(function (e) {
        data.status = 'Failed';
        alert('fail');
});

alert(data.status);

So the status was not set yet. Check it inside the callback. AJAX...
What does AJAX means? A is for async, which means it will fire sometime in the future(near or far), you can't know when and sometimes don't even if it will ever be called.

Updated version:

var data = {status: ''};

rosconnection.setOnOpen(function (e) {
        data.status = 'Succeeded';
        alert(data.status);
});

rosconnection.setOnError(function (e) {
        data.status = 'Failed';
        alert(data.status);
});
share|improve this answer
    
So basically its a timing issue? –  JavaCake Feb 9 '13 at 20:12
    
@JavaCake, exactly, AJAX. –  gdoron Feb 9 '13 at 20:13
    
@gdoron You may wish to describe ajax in this sense c.c –  Daedalus Feb 9 '13 at 20:14
    
Is it possible that the setOnError and setOnError are delayed? –  JavaCake Feb 9 '13 at 20:14
1  
@gdoron I would say so, even if it is now apparent the user knew what it meant, it will help for future users. –  Daedalus Feb 9 '13 at 20:25

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