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I keep getting argument 1 is invalid and can't seem to figure out what I am doing wrong. I get the error 3 different times, 2 of them being on line 23. I know it is something to do with the typenames.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

//Josh Haupt
//arraylist.hpp
//
//

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

//#include "arraylist.h"

//----------Big 3 Member Functions

//Destructor
ArrayList<typename T>::~ArrayList
{
  m_size = 0;
  m_max = 0;
  delete[] m_data;
  m_data = NULL;
}

//operator =
ArrayList<typename T>::ArrayList<typename T>& operator=(const ArrayList<typename T>& rhs)
{
m_size = rhs.m_size;
m_max = rhs.m_max;
delete[]m_data;
for(int r = 0; r < m_size; r++)
{
  m_data[r] = rhs.m_data[r];
}
  return *this;
}

//copy construcotor
ArrayList<typename T>::ArrayList(const ArrayList<T>& cpy);
{
  m_size = cpy.m_size;
  m_max = cpy.m_size;
  delete[]m_data;
  for(int c = 0; c < m_size; c++)
{
  m_data[c] = cpy.m_data[c];
}
}

//----------Basic Getters

//int size
int ArrayList<typename T>::m_size()const
{
return m_size;
}

int max() const { return m_max; };
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closed as too localized by Frédéric Hamidi, talonmies, Neolisk, Vin, bragboy Feb 10 '13 at 3:36

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Which is line 23? –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 9 '13 at 20:59
    
there are ()missing behind the destructor definition –  scones Feb 9 '13 at 20:59
2  
using namespace std; - Get rid of this line from your header file... it might cause you troubles with ambiguity of some names ...if you find yourself lazy to type std::, then keep it in your .cpp files at least. –  LihO Feb 9 '13 at 21:02

2 Answers 2

You're defining member functions of a template class incorrectly. They should each look something like this:

template <typename T>
return_type ArrayList<T>::function_name(args)
{
  // ...
}

You've also screwed up the syntax for operator=. It should be:

template <typename T>
ArrayList<T>& ArrayList<T>::operator=(...)
{
  // ...
}

And you're missing parentheses on your destructor definition:

template <typename T>
ArrayList<T>::~ArrayList()
{
  // ...
}
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+1 because OP and others are not seeing our answers. –  Aniket Feb 9 '13 at 21:08

Also this is wrong:

ArrayList<typename T>::ArrayList<typename T>& operator=(const ArrayList<typename T>& rhs)

It should be

template <typename T>
ArrayList<T>& ArrayList<T>::operator=(const ArrayList<T>& rhs)

Also this function: m_size() should be defined as so:

template <typename T>
int ArrayList<T>::m_size()const
{
    return m_size;
}

Your copy constructor makes no sense

it should be like this:

template<typename T>
ArrayList<T>::ArrayList(const ArrayList<T>& cpy);
{
   m_size = cpy.m_size;
   m_max = cpy.m_size;
   delete[]m_data; /*If you are deleting `m_data` why are you accessing it in the code below?*/
   for(int c = 0; c < m_size; c++)
   {
      m_data[c] = cpy.m_data[c];
   }
}

Remedy: Study C++ again and practice it until you get it!

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