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I'm coding in Python but I don't quite understand what the point of a factorial and fibonacci are. When in coding am I suppose to use this understanding. What am I missing?

def factorial(n):
    """
    n0 = 0
    n * factorial(n-1)
    """
    if n == 0:
        return 1
    else:
        return n * factorial(n-1)

def fibonacci(n):
    """
    f0 = 0
    f1 = 1
    fn = fn-1 + fn-2
    """
    if n < 2:
        return n
    else:
        return fibonacci(n-1) + fibonacci(n-2)
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closed as not constructive by Martijn Pieters, A--C, martineau, delnan, Dirk Eddelbuettel Feb 9 '13 at 21:37

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
For one, you may have missed reading the FAQ; please only ask for help with practical problems you are facing with code. :-) This question is both off-topic and not constructive, I'm afraid. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 9 '13 at 21:36
2  
The point is exercise in coding. If you can't even turn a trivial arithmetic formula into code, how are you supposed to turn anything more complex into code? –  delnan Feb 9 '13 at 21:36
    
It is a valid question and I had I valid answer for it. –  Julien Grenier Feb 9 '13 at 21:37
1  
From the perspective of computer science education, both functions are a very nice introduction to recursion. aFter the initial foray into recursion, you can then use them to study how to recast recursive algorithms into non-recursive algorithms. Taking the study another step along, you can then motivate techniques that involve cacheing results from previous execution cycles to speed up later performance. –  John Percival Hackworth Feb 9 '13 at 21:38
1  
@MartijnPieters I don't mean to be rude, but your answer is what is not constructive. A constructive answer would be pointing me to a place where I can have this question answered without ridicule. :-D –  pythondjango Feb 9 '13 at 21:43

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