Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to ensure that blocked threads get woken up in the same order as they got blocked? I read somewhere that this would be called a "strong lock" but I found no resources on that.

On Mac OS X one can design a FIFO queue that stores all the thread ids of the blocked threads and then use the nifty function pthread_cond_signal_thread_np() to wake up one specific thread - which is obviously non-standard and non-portable.

One way I can think of is to use a similar queue and at the unlock() point send a broadcast() to all threads and have them check which one is the next in line.
But this would induce lots of overhead.

A way around the problem would be to issue packaged_task's to the queue and have it process them in order. But that seems more like a workaround to me than a solution.

Edit:
As pointed out by the comments, this question may sound irrelevant, since there is in principle no guaranteed ordering of locking attempts.
As a clarification:

I have something I call a ConditionLockQueue which is very similar to the NSConditionLock class in the Cocoa library, but it maintains a FIFO queue of blocked threads instead of a more-or-less random pool.

Essentially any thread can "line up" (with or without the requirement of a specific 'condition' - a simple integer value - to be met). The thread is then placed on the queue and blocks until it is the frontmost element in the queue whose condition is met.

This provides a very flexible way of synchronization and I have found it very helpful in my program.
Now what I really would need is a way to wake up a specific thread with a specific id.
But these problems are almost alike.

share|improve this question
    
please explain why do you need to preserve order... and how can you guarantee that threads will arrive to the lock in the order you want them to arrive. –  NoSenseEtAl Feb 9 '13 at 21:54
    
Well, first its interesting! Then it just fitted well into my program ;) I could design it to be more asynchronous, but if there was another way it would be simpler. –  iolo Feb 9 '13 at 21:58
    
my point is that even if you get this solution it is meaningless since you need to guarantee that threads arrive at the lock in some order and without previous synchronization you cant do that. I could be wrong so that is why I asked for explanation of your design. –  NoSenseEtAl Feb 9 '13 at 22:02
    
Well, if you REALLY want to do that, I think the best thing is to have a "who's next" queue built into the locking mechanism. But I still think it seems like a problem looking for a new problem, so now you have TWO problems... ;) –  Mats Petersson Feb 9 '13 at 22:03
1  
So at some point the threads have to be synchronized again and executed 'single-threaded'? Why not at the point where you would now lock, put std::functions (or similar) on a FIFO queue and just process that single-threaded and meanwhile wait in the thread until that function is completed? It would give the same effect and you need only locking for the FIFO queue and maybe some condition/wake-up/future mechanism to continue the thread. –  KillianDS Feb 9 '13 at 22:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Building on @Chris Dodd's answer, using a queue of condition variables instead of tickets

#include <deque>
#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>

class ordered_lock {
    std::mutex q_lock;
    std::deque<std::condition_variable*> q;
    std::condition_variable q_empty;
public:
    void ordered_lock::lock()
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(q_lock);
        std::condition_variable cv;
        q.push_back(&cv);
        q_empty.notify_one();
        cv.wait(acquire);
    }

    void ordered_lock::unlock()
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(q_lock);
        while (q.size() == 0)
            q_empty.wait(acquire);

        std::condition_variable *cv  = q.front();
        q.pop_front();
        cv->notify_one();
    }
};

This let's a thread wait on its individual condition variable. Since there's only one thread waiting on any condition variable, it is easy to pick a specific thread for wake up.

Although, I don't know, if this scales and if there's a limit on the maximum number of condition variables in a single program.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like it could do it. But I see there is no easy and efficient way on doing this, so I better abandon this road I guess... –  iolo Feb 10 '13 at 13:50
    
unlock() operations should be paired with preceding lock() operations. Given this, it seems wastefull to me to make sure the queue isn't empty in unlock(), because (in a correct program) the queue will always have at least one element: the one that we created when we entered the lock. Thus I think the q_empty condition variable and the associated logic can be removed. –  ultimA Oct 27 '13 at 14:39
    
Also, it seems to me that this will never work. The very first call to lock() will unconditionally block in cv.wait(acquire), and because we were the first to enter, there is nobody to exit the lock (nobody to call unlock()). Hence cv->notify_one() in unlock() is never called, hence the first lock() blocks forever (or until a spurious wakeup). –  ultimA Oct 27 '13 at 14:43

Its pretty easy to build a lock object that uses numbered tickets to insure that its completely fair (lock is granted in the order threads first tried to acquire it):

#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>

class ordered_lock {
    std::condition_variable  cvar;
    std::mutex               cvar_lock;
    unsigned int             next_ticket, counter;
public:
    ordered_lock() : next_ticket(0), counter(0) {}
    void lock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(cvar_lock);
        unsigned int ticket = next_ticket++;
        while (ticket != counter)
            cvar.wait(acquire);
    }
    void unlock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(cvar_lock);
        counter++;
        cvar.notify_all();
    }
};

edit

To fix Olaf's suggestion:

#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>
#include <queue>

class ordered_lock {
    std::queue<std::condition_variable>  cvar;
    std::mutex                           cvar_lock;
    bool                                 locked
public:
    ordered_lock : lock(false);
    void lock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(cvar_lock);
        if (locked) {
            cvar.push(std::condition_variable());
            cvar.back().wait(acquire);
        } else {
            locked = true;
        }
    }
    void unlock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(cvar_lock);
        if (cvar.empty()) {
            locked = false;
        } else {
            cvar.front().notify_one();
            cvar.pop();
        }
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Yes that is a possibility. But as mentioned in my post, the induced overhead is too great. Imagine you have lots of threads. They would all contend for the mutex and before you have the correct thread an estimated 50 threads are going to wake up and put themselves to sleep again. That is not efficient. –  iolo Feb 10 '13 at 10:24
    
@lolo Then use a queue of one condition variable per thread instead. –  Olaf Dietsche Feb 10 '13 at 12:12
    
Just to give an update to this solution: The second piece of code would no longer work due to the face that std::condition_variable now has its move constructor deleted. –  Quirliom Nov 5 at 20:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.