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Is there a way to ensure that blocked threads get woken up in the same order as they got blocked? I read somewhere that this would be called a "strong lock" but I found no resources on that.

On Mac OS X one can design a FIFO queue that stores all the thread ids of the blocked threads and then use the nifty function pthread_cond_signal_thread_np() to wake up one specific thread - which is obviously non-standard and non-portable.

One way I can think of is to use a similar queue and at the unlock() point send a broadcast() to all threads and have them check which one is the next in line.
But this would induce lots of overhead.

A way around the problem would be to issue packaged_task's to the queue and have it process them in order. But that seems more like a workaround to me than a solution.

Edit:
As pointed out by the comments, this question may sound irrelevant, since there is in principle no guaranteed ordering of locking attempts.
As a clarification:

I have something I call a ConditionLockQueue which is very similar to the NSConditionLock class in the Cocoa library, but it maintains a FIFO queue of blocked threads instead of a more-or-less random pool.

Essentially any thread can "line up" (with or without the requirement of a specific 'condition' - a simple integer value - to be met). The thread is then placed on the queue and blocks until it is the frontmost element in the queue whose condition is met.

This provides a very flexible way of synchronization and I have found it very helpful in my program.
Now what I really would need is a way to wake up a specific thread with a specific id.
But these problems are almost alike.

share|improve this question
    
please explain why do you need to preserve order... and how can you guarantee that threads will arrive to the lock in the order you want them to arrive. – NoSenseEtAl Feb 9 '13 at 21:54
    
Well, first its interesting! Then it just fitted well into my program ;) I could design it to be more asynchronous, but if there was another way it would be simpler. – iolo Feb 9 '13 at 21:58
    
my point is that even if you get this solution it is meaningless since you need to guarantee that threads arrive at the lock in some order and without previous synchronization you cant do that. I could be wrong so that is why I asked for explanation of your design. – NoSenseEtAl Feb 9 '13 at 22:02
    
Well, if you REALLY want to do that, I think the best thing is to have a "who's next" queue built into the locking mechanism. But I still think it seems like a problem looking for a new problem, so now you have TWO problems... ;) – Mats Petersson Feb 9 '13 at 22:03
1  
So at some point the threads have to be synchronized again and executed 'single-threaded'? Why not at the point where you would now lock, put std::functions (or similar) on a FIFO queue and just process that single-threaded and meanwhile wait in the thread until that function is completed? It would give the same effect and you need only locking for the FIFO queue and maybe some condition/wake-up/future mechanism to continue the thread. – KillianDS Feb 9 '13 at 22:31
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Building on @Chris Dodd's answer, using a queue of condition variables instead of tickets

#include <deque>
#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>

class ordered_lock {
    std::mutex q_lock;
    std::deque<std::condition_variable*> q;
    std::condition_variable q_empty;
public:
    void lock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(q_lock);
        std::condition_variable cv;
        q.push_back(&cv);
        q_empty.notify_one();
        cv.wait(acquire);
    }

    void unlock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(q_lock);
        while (q.size() == 0)
            q_empty.wait(acquire);

        std::condition_variable *cv  = q.front();
        q.pop_front();
        cv->notify_one();
    }

    int size() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(q_lock);
        return q.size();
    }
};

This let's a thread wait on its individual condition variable. Since there's only one thread waiting on any condition variable, it is easy to pick a specific thread for wake up.

Although, I don't know, if this scales and if there's a limit on the maximum number of condition variables in a single program.


To address the issues raised, I wrote a small test program

#include <thread>

ordered_lock g;

void t()
{
    g.lock();
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    std::thread t1(t);
    std::thread t2(t);
    std::thread t3(t);

    while (g.size() < 3) {
        // busy waiting for the threads to lock in any order
    }

    while (g.size() > 0) {
        // unlock threads in lock order
        g.unlock();
    }

    t1.join();
    t2.join();
    t3.join();

    return 0;
}

With a few debug print statements in lock(), everybody can see, it doesn't work, although not for the reasons stated.

It does not work, because of OS scheduling policies. When we assume lock order t1, t2, t3, it might (and does) happen, that the main thread unlocks t1 and t2, then t2 is rescheduled, ...

main: g.unlock() // t1
main: g.unlock() // t2
t2: wakeup
main: g.unlock() // t3
t1: wakeup
t3: wakeup

or in any other order, even the desired one

main: g.unlock() // t1
t1: wakeup
main: g.unlock() // t2
t2: wakeup
main: g.unlock() // t3
t3: wakeup

Fortunately, we can fix ordered_lock and force the desired order by moving q.pop_front() into the lock() method

void lock() {
    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(q_lock);
    std::condition_variable cv;
    q.push_back(&cv);
    q_empty.notify_one();
    cv.wait(acquire);
    q.pop_front();
}

void unlock() {
    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(q_lock);
    while (q.size() == 0)
        q_empty.wait(acquire);

    std::condition_variable *cv  = q.front();
    cv->notify_one();
}

Removing the condition variable from the queue inside lock() ensures that no other thread can be woken before the front thread is running.

But this has other consequences, of course.

  • Depending on the program, there might be many more unlocks than previous locks.
  • Unless the work is done inside lock (or before q.pop_front()), there might be a reschedule to another thread, which makes the "fix" moot.

You can take care of these issues too, but for a "simple" answer this is already too long.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like it could do it. But I see there is no easy and efficient way on doing this, so I better abandon this road I guess... – iolo Feb 10 '13 at 13:50
    
unlock() operations should be paired with preceding lock() operations. Given this, it seems wastefull to me to make sure the queue isn't empty in unlock(), because (in a correct program) the queue will always have at least one element: the one that we created when we entered the lock. Thus I think the q_empty condition variable and the associated logic can be removed. – ultimA Oct 27 '13 at 14:39
3  
Also, it seems to me that this will never work. The very first call to lock() will unconditionally block in cv.wait(acquire), and because we were the first to enter, there is nobody to exit the lock (nobody to call unlock()). Hence cv->notify_one() in unlock() is never called, hence the first lock() blocks forever (or until a spurious wakeup). – ultimA Oct 27 '13 at 14:43
1  
this code doesn't work. – farukdgn May 31 at 16:20
    
The wait in lock() uses a CV without a predicate, so is inherently wrong. It will think it's been woken when there's a spurious wake, which could lead to multiple mutexes acquiring the lock. unlock will block until there's another thread waiting, which seems unnecessary. All in all, it seems the logic of this code is backwards. – Anthony Williams Jun 13 at 13:08

Its pretty easy to build a lock object that uses numbered tickets to insure that its completely fair (lock is granted in the order threads first tried to acquire it):

#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>

class ordered_lock {
    std::condition_variable  cvar;
    std::mutex               cvar_lock;
    unsigned int             next_ticket, counter;
public:
    ordered_lock() : next_ticket(0), counter(0) {}
    void lock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(cvar_lock);
        unsigned int ticket = next_ticket++;
        while (ticket != counter)
            cvar.wait(acquire);
    }
    void unlock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(cvar_lock);
        counter++;
        cvar.notify_all();
    }
};

edit

To fix Olaf's suggestion:

#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>
#include <queue>

class ordered_lock {
    std::queue<std::condition_variable>  cvar;
    std::mutex                           cvar_lock;
    bool                                 locked;
public:
    ordered_lock() : locked(false) {};
    void lock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(cvar_lock);
        if (locked) {
            cvar.emplace();
            cvar.back().wait(acquire);
        } else {
            locked = true;
        }
    }
    void unlock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> acquire(cvar_lock);
        if (cvar.empty()) {
            locked = false;
        } else {
            cvar.front().notify_one();
            cvar.pop();
        }
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Yes that is a possibility. But as mentioned in my post, the induced overhead is too great. Imagine you have lots of threads. They would all contend for the mutex and before you have the correct thread an estimated 50 threads are going to wake up and put themselves to sleep again. That is not efficient. – iolo Feb 10 '13 at 10:24
    
@lolo Then use a queue of one condition variable per thread instead. – Olaf Dietsche Feb 10 '13 at 12:12
1  
@Quirliom: With newer versions of C++, you need emplace_back rather than push_back to avoid the move/copy, but older versions don't have emplace_back – Chris Dodd Jul 19 '15 at 20:55
1  
The second version doesn't work in case of spurious wakeups (the wait might sometimes just continue). Also, I wonder if there is a problem when cvar.pop() is called before the other waiting thread continues. Then the condition variable is destroyed while the other threads still waits on that variable to fire... – Jan Rüegg Mar 16 at 8:23

Are we asking the right questions on this thread??? And if so: are they answered correctly???

Or put another way:

Have I completely misunderstood stuff here??

Edit Paragraph: It seems StatementOnOrder (see below) is false. See link1 (C++ threads etc. under Linux are ofen based on pthreads), and link2 (mentions current scheduling policy as the determining factor) -- Thanks to Cubbi from cppreference (ref). See also link, link, link, link. If the statement is false, then the method of pulling an atomic (!) ticket, as shown in the code below, is probably to be preferred!!

Here goes...

StatementOnOrder: "Multiple threads that run into a locked mutex and thus "go to sleep" in a particular order, will afterwards aquire ownership of the mutex and continue on in the same order."

Question: Is StatementOnOrder true or false ???

void myfunction() {
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(mut);

    // do something
    // ...
    // mutex automatically unlocked when leaving funtion.
}

I'm asking this because all code examples on this page to date, seem to be either:

a) a waste (if StatementOnOrder is true)

or

b) seriously wrong (if StatementOnOrder is false).

So why do a say that they might be "seriously wrong", if StatementOnOrder is false?
The reason is that all code examples think they're being super-smart by utilizing std::condition_variable, but are actually using locks before that, which will (if StatementOnOrder is false) mess up the order!!!
Just search this page for std::unique_lock<std::mutex>, to see the irony.

So if StatementOnOrder is really false, you cannot run into a lock, and then handle tickets and condition_variables stuff after that. Instead, you'll have to do something like this: pull an atomic ticket before running into any lock!!!
Why pull a ticket, before running into a lock? Because here we're assuming StatementOnOrder to be false, so any ordering has to be done before the "evil" lock.

#include <mutex>
#include <thread>
#include <limits>
#include <atomic>
#include <cassert>
#include <condition_variable>
#include <map>

std::mutex mut;
std::atomic<unsigned> num_atomic{std::numeric_limits<decltype(num_atomic.load())>::max()};
unsigned num_next{0};
std::map<unsigned, std::condition_variable> mapp;

void function() {
    unsigned next = ++num_atomic; // pull an atomic ticket

    decltype(mapp)::iterator it;

    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(mut);
    if (next != num_next) {
        auto it = mapp.emplace(std::piecewise_construct,
                               std::forward_as_tuple(next),
                               std::forward_as_tuple()).first;
        it->second.wait(lock);
        mapp.erase(it);
    }



    // THE FUNCTION'S INTENDED WORK IS NOW DONE
    // ...
    // ...
    // THE FUNCTION'S INDENDED WORK IS NOW FINISHED

    ++num_next;

    it = mapp.find(num_next); // this is not necessarily mapp.begin(), since wrap_around occurs on the unsigned                                                                          
    if (it != mapp.end()) {
        lock.unlock();
        it->second.notify_one();
    }
}

The above function guarantees that the order is executed according to the atomic ticket that is pulled. (Edit: using boost's intrusive map, an keeping condition_variable on the stack (as a local variable), would be a nice optimization, which can be used here, to reduce free-store usage!)

But the main question is: Is StatementOnOrder true or false???
(If it is true, then my code example above is a also waste, and we can just use a mutex and be done with it.)
I wish somebody like Anthony Williams would check out this page... ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Why are there so many questions in your answer? Right now I cannot really identify wether or not it actually is an answer. Please properly format your answer and remove the empty dot-lines and the massive amount of questions. Or simply ask a question instead. – luk2302 Jun 12 at 17:01
    
There is just one predicate-based (i.e. true/false) question in my "text". Depending on whether the answer to that predicate-question is true or false; the other answers on this page to date, are highly questionable. I'm sorry if the text comes across as spam (that's certainly not the intent), but it's a complicated subject matter; and I'm not willing to compromise, but intend to get this answered correctly. – ajneu Jun 12 at 17:10
    
Given that the OS can suspend your thread indefinitely at any time, you really don't need to worry about which thread acquires a mutex first when multiple threads are competing for a mutex. The OS will choose the one that is "best", and most OSes will also try and ensure that threads aren't starved for too long. – Anthony Williams Jun 13 at 13:03
    
Thanks for chiming in. So if I read your comment correctly... the end of the story would be: if you need to ensure order, ensure order yourself. Order is NOT ensured by when threads call anything. (Ensuring that sleeping threads continue in the same order that the run into a mutex, is NOT at all a good way of handling things). – ajneu Jun 13 at 15:49
    
Ensuring that sleeping threads continue in the same order that they run into a mutex (which is often arbitary anyway!!! [from a user's view]), is NOT at all a good way of handling things. INSTEAD use your own locks in the calling code, or "serialize" calls that require order, by doing these calls sequentially in a single thread. – ajneu Jun 13 at 15:56

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