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I am trying to read fields from a query into a text string arrary. In vb6 I can simply declare the array and then read the fields into it without it caring what type of values are in it. Now when I try to do that same thing I get an "unable to cast com object of type 'dao.fieldclass' to type 'system.string". Do I need to read the field value into a seperarte variable and then convert it to a string? The seqNum is what I am having the problem with

Public dbEngine As dao.DBEngine
Public db As dao.Database, recSet As dao.Recordset
dbEngine = New dao.DBEngine
Dim seqNum As Long
scExportTemplatePath = "M:\robot\scTemplates\"
db = dbEngine.OpenDatabase(scExportStuffPath & "scExport.mdb")
tsOut = fso.CreateTextFile(wildePath & dte & "-" & fle.Name & ".csv", True)
With recSet
    .MoveFirst()
    Do While Not .EOF
        seg = .Fields("segmentID")
        If seg <> segHold Then
            seqNum = 1
        End If
        arrOut(0) = .Fields("jobnum_AM")
    Loop
End With
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You appear to be writing a recordset to a text file, do you need to do this record by record? –  Fionnuala Feb 9 '13 at 22:05
    
yes, I am reading record by record to write to the text file, this needs to be done this way because I will be performing some calculations that will be dependant on what the previous record contains –  eric schmidt Feb 10 '13 at 2:46
    
You are welcome. Also, since you are new to StackOverflow, I would like to inform you that you can upvote good answers and accept the answer that helped you the most by checking the tick mark next to the Answer. On this site an upvote or an accepted answer counts as a "thanks". –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Feb 12 '13 at 14:08

2 Answers 2

You have several problems with this code. In addition to the points mentioned by Jeremy:

  1. What was Long in VB6 is now Integer in VB.NET. Long is a 64 bit integer now.

  2. Use System.IO.Path.Combine in order to combine path strings. Combine automatically adds missing backslashes and removes superfluous ones. Path.Combine(scExportTemplatePath, "scExport.mdb")

  3. The Field property does not have a default property any more. Non-indexed properties are never default properties in VB.NET. Get the field value with .Fields("segmentID").Value.

  4. Convert its value to the appropriate type: seg = Convert.ToInt32(.Fields("segmentID").Value)
    Note: VB's Integer type is just an alias for System.Int32.

  5. You are always adding to the same array field. I don't know exactly what you have in mind. If you want to add one field only, you could just use a List(Of String). If you are adding several fields for each record, then a List(Of String()) (i.e. a list of string arrays) would be appropriate. Lists have the advantage that they grow automatically.

Dim list As New List(Of String())
Do While Not .EOF
    Dim values = New String(2) {}
    values(0) = Convert.ToString(.Fields("field_A").Value)
    values(1) = Convert.ToString(.Fields("field_B").Value)
    values(2) = Convert.ToString(.Fields("field_C").Value)
    list.Add(values)
    recSet.MoveNext()
Loop

But it is more comprehensible, if you create a custom class for storing your field values:

Console.WriteLine("{0} {1} ({2})", user.FirstName, user.LastName, user.DateOfBirth)

... reads much better than:

Console.WriteLine("{0} {1} ({2})", values(0), values(1), values(2))

In VB.NET you have other possibilities to work with databases:

Dim list As New List(Of String())
Using conn = New OleDb.OleDbConnection( _
        "Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;Data Source=MyPath\MyDb.mdb")
    Dim sql = "SELECT myStuff FROM myTable"
    Dim command = New OleDbCommand(sql, conn)
    conn.Open()
    Using reader As OleDbDataReader = command.ExecuteReader()
        While reader.Read()
            Dim values = New String(reader.FieldCount - 1) {}
            For i = 0 To reader.FieldCount - 1
                values(i) = Convert.ToString(reader.GetValue(i))
            Next
            list.Add(values)
        End While
    End Using
End Using

Note that the Using statement closes the resources automatically at the end. Even if an error occurs and the code is terminated prematurely.


In VB.NET you can write to files like this (without using fso, which is not .NET like)

Using writer As New StreamWriter("myFile.txt", False)
    writer.WriteLine("line 1")
    writer.WriteLine("line 2")
    writer.WriteLine("line 3")
End Using
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thank you, this is very helpful, i especially like how you gave me specific's with my code, but what if I wanted to read through a query that already exists in my db so that i don't have to write the SQL in my code? –  eric schmidt Feb 12 '13 at 5:27
    
Try SELECT * FROM myQuery –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Feb 12 '13 at 14:06

1) You dont show how you open the Recordset, eg:

Set recSet = db.OpenRecordset("query_name or SQL")

2) You dont have a .MoveNext in the While Loop:

With recSet
 .MoveFirst()
  Do While Not .EOF
  seg = .Fields("segmentID")
    If seg <> segHold Then
     seqNum = 1
    End If
    arrOut(0) = .Fields("jobnum_AM")
    .MoveNext()
  loop
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