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Hey take a look at the code:

#define SUFFIX(n)  (switch(n)                                               \
                   {                                                        \
                        case 1: printf("st\n");                             \
                        break;                                              \
                                                                            \
                        case 2: printf("nd\n");                             \
                        break;                                              \
                                                                            \
                        case 3: printf("rd\n");                             \
                        break;                                              \
                   }                                                        \
                   )                                                        

calling the above macro in main:

int main()
{
    printf("%s", suffix(1));
}

But when I call this I get a error message:

expected expression before switch

But what expression am I missing?

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1  
I feel you're confusing expressions and statements and GNU compound expressions... –  user529758 Feb 9 '13 at 23:03
1  
You want a function, not a macro. –  Gabe Feb 9 '13 at 23:04
    
What will happen If i use macros. I think functio overheads kill a bit of time every time its called so why not macros? Just asking BTW –  user1971996 Feb 9 '13 at 23:05
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you're trying to do won't work. switch is a statement but printf requires an expression.

Option 1:

Remove the brackets () from your #define and simply say SUFFIX(1) without the printf.

#define SUFFIX(n)  switch(n)                                               \
                   { case 1: printf("st\n"); break;                        \
                     case 2: printf("nd\n"); break;                        \
                     case 3: printf("rd\n"); break;                        \
                   }
int main()
{
    SUFFIX(1);
}

Option 2:

#define SUFFIX(n) ( n == 1 ? "st" : (n == 2 ? "nd" : (n == 3 ? "rd" : "")) )
int main()
{
  printf("%s", SUFFIX(1));
}

Option 3 and 4:

Make one of the above a function. The first returns void, the second returns char *.

share|improve this answer
    
You must be C god, Thanks a lot, How silly of me to make this mistake! –  user1971996 Feb 9 '13 at 23:17
    
BTW should I use this macro or a function? –  user1971996 Feb 9 '13 at 23:17
    
Yeah thanks a lot, First option worked. Should I use macro or function??? –  user1971996 Feb 9 '13 at 23:21
1  
@user1971996 Functions add a tiny bit of overhead but you can't step into macros when debugging, they increase your code size, can make your code a bit messy and don't do type checking (just off the top of my head). Both have advantages and disadvantages (with functions looking slightly better). So it's up to your really. –  Dukeling Feb 9 '13 at 23:22
    
Thanks a lot, I used macros BTW. –  user1971996 Feb 9 '13 at 23:28
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