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I'm C# developer who is trying to use object oriented programing in javascripts. For the following code

var np =  np || {};

 np.Class1 = function () {

    var var1,
        var2,
        var3;

    var init = function(a) {
        var1 = a;
        this.var2 = a;
        init3(a);
    };

    var init3 = function(b) {
        this.var3 = b;
    };

    return {
        init: init,
        var1: var1,
        var2: var2,
        var3: var3
    };
};

var t = new np.Class1();
t.init("t");
console.log("var1 " + t.var1);
console.log("var2 " + t.var2);
console.log("var3 " + t.var3);

I'm getting:

 var1 undefined 
 var2 t 
 var3 undefined 

The only way which I can get to private variables in Class1 is to use this.var2 = a; but it is not working for function which is call from other function. How can I access to private variables from function init3()?

Edited

Even if I change function init3() like this

var init3 = function(b) {
  var3 = b;
};

the result is the same. So question is still valid. How can I manipulate private variables from function?

share|improve this question
    
Use var3 = b;. What are you trying to do? –  Blender Feb 9 '13 at 23:07
    
a? b? You didn't define them. –  Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 9 '13 at 23:11
    
var3 = b; is not working too... –  Grande Wu Feb 9 '13 at 23:26
    
a and b are parameters of function, set when calling the function –  Grande Wu Feb 9 '13 at 23:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your return statement

return {
        init: init,
        var1: var1,
        var2: var2,
        var3: var3
    };

is exposing (setting as properties of the returned object) the initial values of the variables (before init has run), which are undefined. You later overwrite the exposed value of var2 by setting this.var2 = a, and try to do something similar for var3, but (as noted in previous answers) it doesn't work because this within init3 refers to window. So the object properties var1 and var3 remain undefined and only var2 changes.

If these variables were objects (including arrays and functions, as init is), they would be passed by reference rather than by value, so the output of console.log("var1 " + t.var1); etc. would represent the current value, not the initial value.

For illustration, try this:

np.Class1 = function () {
    var someVariables = {},
        self;

    var init = function(a) {
        self = this; // self now refers to the object from which init was called
        someVariables.var1 = a;
        this.var2 = a;
        init3(a);
    };

    var init3 = function(b) {
        self.var3 = b;
    };

    return {
        init: init,
        vars: someVariables
    };
};

var t = new np.Class1();
t.init("t");
console.log("var1 " + t.vars.var1); // 't'
console.log("var2 " + t.var2); // 't'
console.log("var3 " + t.var3); // 't'
var newObj = {init: t.init}
newObj.init(true);
console.log(newObj); // Object {init: function, var2: true, var3: true}
share|improve this answer

You're exposing the local var3 in your returned object, but you never set it to anything; you only ever set this.var3. You'd have to set var3 = b for it to return a value.

Additionally, if your intention is for them to be private, why are you exposing them directly? Wouldn't you rather expose functions that manipulate the private state of your object (since you're trying to be object-oriented)?

share|improve this answer
    
I'm exposing them just to validate it, just for test purpose. I know this whole class is quite strange but my question is about accesing private variables from functions. –  Grande Wu Feb 9 '13 at 23:22

Rather than using:

init3(a);

Try:

init3.call(this, a);

Why? When you use init3(a), this is set to the global object (window in browser environments). The call method of functions lets you set this to something else. In this case, we just want to propagate our this value.

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