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I am trying to decode UTF8 byte by byte with charset decoder. Is this possible?

The following code

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Charset cs = Charset.forName("utf8");
    CharsetDecoder decoder = cs.newDecoder();
    CoderResult res;

    byte[] source = new byte[] {(byte)0xc3, (byte)0xa6}; // LATIN SMALL LETTER AE in UTF8

    byte[] b = new byte[1];
    ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.wrap(b);

    char[] c = new char[1];
    CharBuffer cb = CharBuffer.wrap(c);

    decoder.reset();

    b[0] = source[0];
    bb.rewind();

    cb.rewind();
    res = decoder.decode(bb, cb, false);

    System.out.println(res);
    System.out.println(cb.remaining());

    b[0] = source[1];
    bb.rewind();

    cb.rewind();
    res = decoder.decode(bb, cb, false);

    System.out.println(res);
    System.out.println(cb.remaining());



}

gives the following output.

UNDERFLOW
1
MALFORMED[1]
1

Why?

share|improve this question
    
@jlordo these reasons are offtopic in this question –  Suzan Cioc Feb 9 '13 at 23:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

My theory is that the problem with the way that you are doing it is that in the "underflow" condition, the decoder leaves the unconsumed bytes in the input buffer. At least, that is my reading.

Note this sentence in the javadoc:

"In any case, if this method is to be reinvoked in the same decoding operation then care should be taken to preserve any bytes remaining in the input buffer so that they are available to the next invocation. "

But you are clobbering the (presumably) unread byte.

You should be able to check whether my theory / interpretation is correct by looking at how many bytes remain unconsumed in bb after the first decode(...) call.


If my theory is correct then the answer is that you cannot decode UTF-8 by providing the decoder with byte buffers containing exactly one byte. But you could implement byte-by-byte decoding by starting with a ByteBuffer containing one byte and adding extra bytes until the decoder succeeds in outputing a character. Just make sure that you don't clobber input bytes that haven't been consumed yet.

Note that decoding like this is not efficient. The API design is optimized for decoding a large number of bytes in one go.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I also noticed this now. But it is strange that this implementation relies on me to copy unconsumed bytes to the new buffer. Also this means that buffer can't be shorter than the longest character decoded. Particularly this means that it is IMPOSSIBLE to decode byte by byte. –  Suzan Cioc Feb 10 '13 at 0:04
    
@SuzanCioc - not impossible. You just have to do it slightly differently. –  Stephen C Feb 10 '13 at 0:06
    
but how? Decoder won't accept one byte and won't remember it. So I am obliged to feed it with 2 bytes (in current case). So I need at least 2-byte buffer. No way to feed by byte! –  Suzan Cioc Feb 10 '13 at 0:12
    
@SuzanCioc - Yes you need a buffer with a capacity of up to 6 bytes. But you can still keep adding bytes one by one ... which should satisfy your higher-level requirement of byte-by-byte decoding. Think outside the box!. –  Stephen C Feb 10 '13 at 0:16

As has been said, utf has 1-6 bytes per char. you need to add all bytes to the bytebuffer before you decode try this:

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Charset cs = Charset.forName("utf8");
    CharsetDecoder decoder = cs.newDecoder();
    CoderResult res;

    byte[] source = new byte[] {(byte)0xc3, (byte)0xa6}; // LATIN SMALL LETTER AE in UTF8

    byte[] b = new byte[2]; //two bytes for this char
    ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.wrap(b);

    char[] c = new char[1];
    CharBuffer cb = CharBuffer.wrap(c);

    decoder.reset();

    b[0] = source[0];
    b[1] = source[1];
    bb.rewind();

    cb.rewind();
    res = decoder.decode(bb, cb, false); //translates 2 bytes to 1 char

    System.out.println(cb.remaining()); //prints 0
    System.out.println(cb.get(0)); //prints latin ae

}
share|improve this answer
2  
UTF-8 has anywhere from 1 to 6 bytes per character –  Simon G. Feb 9 '13 at 23:34
    
How can I know in advance, how many bytes should I allocate? Suppose I will add one more byte, but it also can appear to be malformed. –  Suzan Cioc Feb 9 '13 at 23:39
1  
Allocate for six bytes. As long as the CharsetDecoder can read at least one full character at a time, it'll be happy; it'll just leave the extra bytes in the ByteBuffer, where you should compact them. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 9 '13 at 23:42
    
Louis, many thanks for hint about compact()! –  Suzan Cioc Feb 10 '13 at 0:05
    
LouisWasserman @SimonG. You're both wrong. UTF-8 can contain max. 4 bytes per character. See this SO question or my blog post on this topic. –  Stijn de Witt Aug 8 at 22:52

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