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for (int ii = 0 ; ii < 200 ; ii++)
    {
     encrypt();    
    }

long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int ii = 0 ; ii < 2000 ; ii++)
    {
     encrypt();    
    }
long elapsed = System.currentTimeMillis() - start;

for (int ii = 0 ; ii < 200 ; ii++)
    {
     decrypt();    
    }

long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int ii = 0 ; ii < 2000 ; ii++)
    {
     decrypt();    
    }
long elapsed = System.currentTimeMillis() - start;



private void encrypt()
    {
            M = new BigInteger(64,random);
            C = M.multiply(k).mod(N);  
    }

private void decrypt()
    {
            kk= k.modinverse(N); 
            Mp = kk.multiply(c).mod(N); 
    }

But I feel that the results are incorrect when run this program on netbeans platform. Is there way to compare any two algorithm cryptography under execution time . Is necessary decrypt algorithm take long time than encrypt algorithm? Please any suggest.

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marked as duplicate by GregS, Andrew White, AlexWien, Sudarshan, Steven Penny Feb 11 '13 at 5:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I would ignore the results of the first 10000 test and run them for at least 2-10 seconds after it has warmed up. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 14 '13 at 18:31
    
It is worth remembering that random can take longer than the thing you are testing. I would try to build your random data before you start timing. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 14 '13 at 18:32
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1 Answer 1

First of all, your encrypt and decrypt methods are obviously not correct for any serious security.

The encryption method also seems to contain the generation of a random BigInteger. Normally you would only do this when generating a key pair (and then you would generate a prime, not any random integer, at least for the RSA algorithm). So what kind of encryption/decryption method this is is beyond me.

Furthermore, it takes a long time for the Java VM to optimize. So basically you are best off using a very high number of testing rounds, then divide the elapsed time with the number of rounds.

Your current output very much hinges on the state of the random number generator. If the entropy is depleted, it will take a long time for it to generate new numbers.

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Thank you for all.I will ignore that line which contain of generate random big-integer. If this method valid to compare between encrypt/decrypt elapsed time. now just I like to know. How many number of iteration to reach an acceptable outcome? –  mahmoud_zaiin Feb 10 '13 at 19:17
    
Depends on the system configuration. It could be that this is enough, but the best way to test is to go for a really high number, a few million. The minimum is not clear, but in general, if the average of a few million times is identical to the average of a few thousand times then you are getting valid results. –  owlstead Feb 10 '13 at 20:15
    
thank you owlstead . Is intended at system configuration computer hardware specifications? such as cpu and ram or else. I run this program on my laptop has cpu ci3 2.30 GH , 2.91 GB of RAM and NetBeans IDE 7.2.1 platform integrated with Java: 1.6.0_37; Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM 20.12-b01. Is it necessary to mention the computer specifications when writing the results in the my project؟ –  mahmoud_zaiin Feb 10 '13 at 20:42
    
I would certainly write down thes system configuration when writing down a result. Note that it also matters if your CPU is performing 32 bit or 64 bit operations. BigInteger consists of 64 bit longs internally (for the Sun implementation) so it presumably runs faster on a 64 bit machine that also has more CPU registers. The IDE and RAM make less of a difference, but it never hurts to include it in the result (together with the VM settings). –  owlstead Feb 10 '13 at 23:22
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