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I am using azure table storage (Note: NOT Azure SQL) and I have the following situation:

In my application I have a number of organisations that 'invite' users, and on the invite there is an associated 'Role' and 'Expiry'. Once the organisation has invited a user I want the org to see the list of users that they have invited, and I want the user to see a list of organisations that they have been invited to.

I think in my application and this case, that there would be low numbers (ie an org would only invite a few users and a user will generally only be invited by one org). However is there a general pattern that people use to deal with this situation even with very large numbers?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have three approaches that I currently use, depending on my needs:

Transactional

I store the forward and inverse relationship on the same partition... this means that EVERY entity is on the same partition (ie this method is rate limited by a single partition), but it means you can use a batch transaction to insert the forward and inverse relationship at the same time which means that you know they will always be correct.

public class OrganisationInvite : TableEntity
{
    // Partition Id - string.Empty
    // Row Id - "Invite_" + OrangisationId + "_" + UserId

    public string Role { get; set; }
    public DateTime Expiry { get; set; }
}

public class OrganisationRequest : TableEntity
{
    // Partition Id - string.Empty
    // Row Id - "Request_" + UserId + "_" + OrganisationId

    public string Role { get; set; }
    public DateTime Expiry { get; set; }
}

To query I use a t.RowKey.StartsWith("Request_...") or t.RowKey.StartsWith("Invite_...") depending on whether I want to get a list of a user/org invites.

I guess this is best used when the data is very critical.

Eventual Consistency

I give both tables all the properties but they live on different partitions, this gives you awesome scalability but you loose the transaction. I use a messaging queue to update the inverse relationship to match the forward relationship, so eventually the data will match. (But for a while it may not).

// Assume both in the same table, thus the prefix on partition
public class OrganisationInvite : TableEntity
{
    // Partition Id - "Invite_" + OrangisationId
    // Row Id -  UserId

    public string Role { get; set; }
    public DateTime Expiry { get; set; }
}

public class OrganisationRequest : TableEntity
{
    // Partition Id - "Request_" + UserId
    // Row Id - OrganisationId

    public string Role { get; set; }
    public DateTime Expiry { get; set; }
}

To query I use a t.PatitionKey == "Request_..." or t.PatitionKey == "Invite_..." depending on whether I want to get a list of a user/org invites. Perhaps you would consider one of these the 'source of truth' so when a user does accept the invite you would look up the 'source of truth' and give the user that role etc.

This is the most scalable solution, and especially makes sense if you are using caching on top of it.

Source of truth

In this case I only give the properties on one entity, and only have the keys of the inverse relationship on the other. You would add the entities to the list that is longest or is queried the most... in this case I would say it is the invites for an org. Like the eventual consistency method you would queue the inverse relationship to add the inverse entity. This method gives you complete data consistency except for when you add a new relationship (as there is a bit of time before the inverse relationship is created), and is highly scalable - there is a higher cost to read the inverse list though.

 // Assume both in the same table, thus the prefix on partition
public class OrganisationInvite : TableEntity
{
    // Partition Id - "Invite_" + OrangisationId
    // Row Id -  UserId

    public string Role { get; set; }
    public DateTime Expiry { get; set; }
}

public class OrganisationRequest : TableEntity
{
    // Partition Id - "Request_" + UserId
    // Row Id - OrganisationId
}

You can trivially query the forward relationship using t.PatitionKey == "Invite_...". The inverse relationship is not trivial though. You have to query using t.PatitionKey == "Request_..." and create n number of parallel calls to get each item's data forward data (In this case to use the org id found in the inverse relationship's RowKey). If the item does not exist then you do not add it to your final list. This ensures that if the org changes its role for example the user will see this change on the next hit.

I think this method is useful if the inverse relationship is used rarely and it is critical that the data is up to date (I'm thinking user permissions etc?)

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