Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm doing another C++ exercise. I have to calculate the value of pi from the infinite series:

pi=4 - 4/3 + 4/5 – 4/7 + 4/9 -4/11+ . . .

The program has to print the approximate value of pi after each of the first 1,000 terms of this series. Here is my code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    double pi=0.0;
    int counter=1;

    for (int i=1;;i+=2)//infinite loop, should "break" when pi=3.14159
    {
        double a=4.0;
        double b=0.0;

        b=a/static_cast<double>(i);

        if(counter%2==0)
            pi-=b;
        else
            pi+=b;

        if(i%1000==0)//should print pi value after 1000 terms,but it doesn't  
            cout<<pi<<endl;

        if(pi==3.14159)//this if statement doesn't work as well
            break;

        counter++;
    }

    return 0;
}

It compiles without errors and warnings, but only the empty console window appears after execution. If I remove line” if(i%1000==0)” , I can see it does run and print every pi value, but it doesn’t stop, which means the second if statement doesn’t work either. I’m not sure what else to do. I’m assuming it is probably a simple logical error.

share|improve this question
    
Programming with Floating-Point Rule #2: never compare non-whole floating-point values for equality. –  RBarryYoung Sep 25 '09 at 20:47
    
@RBarryYoung : What is rule #1? :) –  Moshe Levi Sep 27 '09 at 13:00

10 Answers 10

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Well, i % 1000 will never = 0, as your counter runs from i = 1, then in increments of 2. Hence, i is always odd, and will never be a multiple of 1000.

The reason it never terminates is that the algorithm doesn't converge to exactly 3.14157 - it'll be a higher precision either under or over approximation. You want to say "When within a given delta of 3.14157", so write

if (fabs(pi - 3.14157) < 0.001)
  break

or something similar, for however "close" you want to get before you stop.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with almost all of your answer. HOWEVER, you should change that line of code to "if (fabs(pi - 3.14157) < 0.001)". Otherwise you are checking the wrong condition! –  jprete Sep 25 '09 at 20:07
    
Thanks for the comment, jprete - Stupid mistake, and I've changed the example :) –  Adam Wright Sep 25 '09 at 20:12
    
I have added if (fabs(pi - 3.14157) < 0.001) break and it still doesn't work. I included #<cmath> but only an empty console appears again. –  Mike55 Sep 25 '09 at 20:22
    
If you print the value at each iteration (i.e. remove the if), does it actually converge to a value such that |pi - 3.14157| is less than your delta? –  Adam Wright Sep 25 '09 at 20:27
3  
Nitpick: I assume you meant 3.14159, not 3.14157. –  David Thornley Sep 25 '09 at 20:52

Since you start i at 1 and increment by 2, i is always an odd number, so i % 1000 will never be 0.

share|improve this answer
  1. You have floating point precision issues. Try if(abs(pi - 3.14159) < 0.000005).
  2. i%1000 will never be 0 because i is always odd.
share|improve this answer

Shouldn't it be:

if (counter%1000==0)
share|improve this answer
    
yes it could be or I could write ((i+1)%1000==0) –  Mike55 Sep 25 '09 at 20:10
    
but that would cause it to stop every 500 steps, not every 1000 –  JDunkerley Sep 25 '09 at 20:14
  1. i starts at 1 and then increments by 2. Therefore i is always odd and will never be a multiple of 1000, which is why if (i % 1000 == 0) never passes.

  2. Directly comparing floats doesn't work, due to floating precision issues. You will need to compare that the difference between the values is close enough.

share|improve this answer

you have more than one problem:

A. i%1000==0 will never be true because you're iterating only odd numbers.

B. pi==3.14159 : you cannot compare double values just like that because the way floating point numbers are represented (you can read about it here in another question). in order for it to work you should compare the values in another way - one way is to subtract them from each other and check that the absolute result is lower than 0.0000001.

share|improve this answer
    
Great. Thanks for help. –  Mike55 Sep 25 '09 at 20:14
1  
@Pat: The best way to say "Thanks" here is by upvoting the answer. –  innaM Sep 25 '09 at 20:40
    
I'm still new on this forum. Th.... :) –  Mike55 Sep 25 '09 at 21:09
    
That's ok. Just stop calling this a "forum". It's not. –  innaM Sep 26 '09 at 9:10

By default abs uses the abs macro which is for int. For doubles, use the cmath library.

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

int main()
{
    double pi=0.0;

    double a=4.0;
    int i = 1; 

    for (i=1;;i+=2)
    {

        pi += (1 - 2 * ((i/2)%2)) * a/static_cast<double>(i);          

        if( std::abs(pi - 3.14159) < 0.000001 )
              break;

        if (i > 2000) //1k iterations
              break;
    }

    std::cout<<pi<<std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think the statement if (i>2000) break; is incorrect, because it breaks the loop before it reaches 3.14159 (which is more than 2000 iterations). Adding counter variable with if statement if (counter%1000==0) should fix it. I will post the corrected code. –  Mike55 Sep 27 '09 at 12:58
    
You're correct that the i > 2k breaks before 3.14159 and doesn't really belong. In his original implementation he had two checks, neither of which worked. So, I left it in as an example. –  Todd Sep 28 '09 at 2:00

Here is the corrected code. I thought it may be helpful in the future if somebody has similar problem.

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
double pi=0.0;
int counter=1;

for (int i=1;;i+=2)
{
 double a=4.0;
 double b=0.0;

 b=a/static_cast<double>(i);

 if(counter%2==0)
  pi-=b;
 else
  pi+=b;

 if(counter%1000==0) 
  cout<<pi<<" "<<counter<<endl;


 if (fabs(pi - 3.14159) < 0.000001) 
  break;

 counter++;
}
cout<<pi;

 return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

pi=4 - 4/3 + 4/5 – 4/7 + 4/9 -4/11 + ...

Generalising

pi = Σi=0 (-1)i 4 / (2i+1)

Which gives us a cleaner approach to each term; the i'th term is given by:

double term = pow(-1,i%2) * 4 / (2*i+1);

where i=0,1,2,...,N

So, our loop can be fairly simple, given some number of iterations N

int N=2000;
double pi=0;
for(int i=0; i<N; i++)
{
    double term = pow(-1,i%2) * 4 / (2*(double)i+1);
    pi += term;
    cout << i << "\t" << pi <<endl;
}

Your original question stated "The program has to print the approximate value of pi after each of the first 1,000 terms of this series". This does not imply any need to check whether 3.14159 has been reached, so I have not included this here. The pow(-1,i%2) call is just to avoid if statements (which are slow) and prevent any complications with large i.

Be aware that after a number of iterations, the difference between the magnitude of pi and the magnitude of the correcting term (say -4/25) will be so small that it will go beyond the precision of a double, so you would need higher precision types to deal with it.

share|improve this answer

Here is a better one:

class pi_1000
{
public:
    double doLeibniz( int i ) // Leibniz famous formula for pi, source: Calculus II :)
    {
        return ( ( pow( -1, i ) ) * 4 ) / ( ( 2 * i ) + 1 );
    }

 void piCalc()
{
    double pi = 4;
    int i;

    cout << "\npi calculated each iteration from 1 to 1000\n"; //wording was a bit confusing.
                                                    //I wasn't sure which one is the right one: 0-1000 or each 1000th.
    for( i = 1; i < 1000; i++ )
    {
        pi = pi + doLeibniz( i );
        cout << fixed << setprecision( 5 ) << pi << "\t" << i + 1 << "\n";
    }

    pi = 4;
    cout << "\npi calculated each 1000th iteration from 1 to 20000\n";
    for( i = 1; i < 21000; i++ )
    {
        pi = pi + doLeibniz( i );
        if( ( ( i - 1 ) % 1000 )  == 0 )
            cout << fixed << setprecision( 5 ) << pi << "\t" << i - 1 << "\n";
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.