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Will the following css :

#search_bar {
  width: 300px;
  margin-left:475px;
  height:27px;
}

generate the same position of search bar on every mointor as in the following snapshot ?

enter image description here

Like units in percentage will show the size accordingly on every monitor,is it the same with pixels ? I mean I try to align the search box as visible in the snapshot in the center but I don't know if it will look the same on broader monitors than mine.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Neither monitors nor screen resolution have anything to do with how your element will be positioned. What matters is the width/height of the viewport (especially since desktop users don't always maximize their browser). If the viewport is only 300px wide, not only will your element not be centered, it will be so far to the right that it will appear off screen! If the viewport is 2000px wide, it will be woefully far to the left.

Here are 2 options for perfectly centering an element no matter what the viewport size is.

input.one {
    display: block;
    margin: 0 auto;
    width: 300px;
}

input.two {
    width: 300px;
    margin-left: -150px; /* half of the element's width */
    position: relative;
    left: 50%;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/bGMck/

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I did this : #search_bar { position:absolute; width: 300px; margin-left:475px; height:27px; } Is it okay ? –  saplingPro Feb 10 '13 at 5:26
1  
That's not any different than what you have in your question, and it will not be centered at every viewport. Resize your browser and see for yourself. –  cimmanon Feb 10 '13 at 12:32

If you position an element in pixels, that element is said to be absolute positioned. That means users with a different-sized window may not see it centered on the screen.

You could use JavaScript to reposition centered elements like these on page load or a window resize:

function doResize() {
    var elem = document.getElementById('myCenterDiv');
    var ww = window.innerWidth;
    var elemWidth = elem.offsetWidth;
    elem.style.left = (ww - elemWidth) / 2;
}
window.onload = doResize;
window.onresize = doResize;

Or, you could do it the CSS way:

body {
    position: relative;
}
body > #myCenterDiv {
    position: absolute;
    top: 300px;
    width: 100px;
    height: 80px;
    margin: 0 auto; /* This centers the element */
}
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2  
Or just do it properly with CSS. You shouldn't have to use JS for layout. –  Blender Feb 10 '13 at 2:19
    
I didn't understand the word off center –  saplingPro Feb 10 '13 at 2:25
    
editing on the fly (: –  Samuel Liew Feb 10 '13 at 2:26
2  
It's not absolute positioned unless you set position: absolute. This is a very different thing than specifying width and margins in px. –  keithjgrant Feb 10 '13 at 2:31
    
can you please explain the margin 0 auto property ? If I include it,the search box shifts to the left from the center –  saplingPro Feb 10 '13 at 3:58

In older HTML versions there was a thing called <center> which is now not there. In order to center anything in HTML5, in the css write:

margin-left:auto;
margin-right:auto;

This will center any object.

If you dont want it in the center then you may use Javascript:

var screen = screen.availWidth;
var gapPercent = 20;
var gap = gapPercent/screen;
document.getElementById('search_bar').style.margin-left = "gap + 'px'";

I dont know the exact code, please. Try the code and im sure if the document.get...... Thing is written properly then it would work- i havent used js for quite a time.

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  1. Each browser does have different defaults for things like margin and padding that you may or may not have over written. This is why many people use a reset or normalize css file to keep a level playing field across all browsers. More on the normalize.css below:

http://nicolasgallagher.com/about-normalize-css/

  1. Also, the controlling of how your web page looks across different devices can be handled through what is called responsive design. With css media queries, you can change css rules according to the viewport (viewable portion of user's screen) and make sure that everyone will see what you want them to see. More on media queries and responsive design below:

http://mediaqueri.es/

@media screen and (max-width: 1024px) {
    #search_bar {
    width: 300px;
    margin-left:475px;
    height:27px;
    }
}

@media screen and (min-width: 1025px) {
    #search_bar {
    width: 500px;
    margin-left:30%;
    height:27px;
    }
}

Do a google search on "responsive design" and media queries and you'll find tons of info.

Hope this helps!

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Normalization has nothing to do with the question. –  cimmanon Feb 10 '13 at 3:51
    
Sorry about that. I must have misunderstood. –  Raphael Rafatpanah Feb 10 '13 at 3:53

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