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I am currently coding my first basic socket server, and I have stumbled upon two different forms for the server to communicate with the client - threads (which I think use conn in python) and channels, which I don't really understand - but they seem like another way to communicate between the client and server. What is the difference between the two and how are they best used?

Here is the code as asked for - please pardon my N00biness:)

CONN/THREADS

def clientthread(conn):

    #Sending message to connected client
    #This only takes strings (words)
    conn.send("Welcome to the server. Type something and hit enter\n")

    #loop so that function does not terminate and the thread does not end
    while True:

        #Receiving from client
        data = conn.recv(1024)
        if not data:
            break
        conn.sendall(data)
        print data


    #To close the connection
    conn.close()

while True:

    #Wait to accept a connection - blocking call
    conn, addr = s.accept()
    #display client information (IP address)
    print 'Connected with ' + addr[0] + ':' + str(addr[1])

    #Start new thread takees 1st argument as a function name to be run, second
    #is the tuple of arguments to the function

    start_new_thread(clientthread ,(conn,))

CHANNELS

while True:

    #Wait to accept a connection - blocking call
    channel, details = s.accept()
    #display client information (IP address)
    print 'Connected with ', details

    #Start new thread takees 1st argument as a function name to be run, second
    #is the tuple of arguments to the function

    #Sending message to connected client
    #This only takes strings (words)
    intro = "Welcome to the server. Type something and hit enter"
    print channel.recv(len(intro))

    channel.send(intro)

    #loop so that function does not terminate and the thread does not end
    while True:

        #Receiving from client
        data = channel.recv(1024)
        if not data:
            break
        channel.sendall(data)
        print data

They do exactly the same thing, except one uses channel and the other uses conn

Thanks for all of your help!

share|improve this question
5  
I have no idea what you are talking about. Can you expand, show some sample code, or link to something? I suspect you are thinking of different concurrency schemes (async, forking, threaded, queues, greenlets, etc), which is a consideration independent of sockets and which doesn't have to be the same on the client and server. A socket is a socket. – Francis Avila Feb 10 '13 at 3:15
1  
conn and channels have no special meaning in Python - but if it's helpful, conn = socket() sometimes appears in code. – Thomas Feb 10 '13 at 4:39
    
@thomas so... They are simply conventional variables and thus interchangeable? Thanks – xxmbabanexx Feb 10 '13 at 4:59
    
@xxmbabanexx Right - we're all wondering what you're talking about because you've just asked us how foo and bar are different. You need to tell us what conn and channels are, we have no idea. But that won't be enough - you need to show some code and write a more specific question. It sounds like you don't have the language to describe these yet. If you're not sure what to do next, learn some langauge or build one (or one of each) and ask a question about your code. – Thomas Feb 10 '13 at 5:43
    
By the way, don't go with threads. Try to write server in async way. It's the best model and you should learn how to write programs async. Just set nonblocking on socket(). – Rafał Łużyński Feb 10 '13 at 7:30

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