Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Our software engineering class is currently working on an assignment where we're to create a Java applet that connects to Facebook, allows the user to choose a friend from their friend list, then retrieves that friend's birthday and returns the day of the week that friend was born on.

Now, I've completed the Java applet portion, and it currently allows a user to input any day, month, and year. The day of the week algorithm works perfectly. However, I haven't completed the Facebook portion yet since our class has not covered any sort of Facebook development at all thus far, and the assignment is due in one week.

Anyway, I found an API called "RestFB" which seems like it would be easy enough to learn in the week or so left before this assignment is due. I was wondering if anyone had experience with connecting Facebook to a Java applet, and if so, how can it be done? All I need to do is connect the user, get their friends list, and get the birthdate of the chosen friend. Does anyone have any idea how that could be done? (I know just as much about Facebook development as my instructor, but I'm willing to learn.)

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Michael Petrotta, gnat, SztupY, adeneo, Theo Feb 10 '13 at 13:04

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm sure it can be done. However, calling Facebook APIs from an applet will only work if the applet is trusted ... 'cos the applet will be trying to connect to a service on a different host to the one that the applet was launched from.

Also, applets are not a good idea from a security perspective ... unless you think that Oracle's record with Java-in-a-browser security is miraculously going to improve with Java 7.0.13u and later. (And even if they do, there is the problem that most users don't keep their Java plugins up-to-date.)

share|improve this answer
    
Luckily, one of our course assistants guided us through the creation of a secure "project page" hosted on Amazon's service, so I think that (plus connecting my Facebook account to the developer service and whatnot) should take care of the "trusted" part. Well, hopefully. Also, I know about the whole Java applet security risk deal, but unfortunately, what the instructor specifies is what I do. –  user41419 Feb 10 '13 at 7:20
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.